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Re: Site Maps and Screen Readers

From: Jean-Marie D'Amour <jmdamour@videotron.ca>
Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2001 11:24:45 -0400
Message-ID: <003901c120e7$6b8b25a0$3543c818@ca.mshome.net>
To: "Simon White" <simon.white@jkd.co.uk>, "IG" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Hello all,

The problem with this kind of conversion is that it's works relatively well
for plain documents but render the content of complex document in a pretty
desorder, sort of a puzzle.

Regards

Jean-Marie D'Amour, M.Ed.
CAMO pour personnes handicapées
www.camo.qc.ca
Montréal, Québec, Canada

----- Original Message -----
From: "Simon White" <simon.white@jkd.co.uk>
To: "Charles McCathieNevile" <charles@w3.org>; "David Woolley"
<david@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
Cc: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2001 10:45 AM
Subject: RE: Site Maps and Screen Readers


> Dear All,
> This was a post on a recent I-Design forum that might provide some help
> to those developing for pdf accessiblity. I have not tried it myself and
> I am not a programmer, so please don't take my word for it. If anyone
> else can add to this I think that it would be of great help to many
> people.
>
> Kind regards
>
> Sime
>
> The Acrobat on line tool that converts pages from PDF to HTML is a
> perl program. The better way for current documents would be to have
> this program installed on your server, and then simply code CGI
> links that would automatically do the conversion on the fly as
> needed. That is, for each document, you would have clearly marked
> link to the PDF version, and another link that would be to the CGI
> program that ran the converter. If it works on the Acrobat server,
> it should work on yours.
>
> Unfortunately, Acrobat doesn't seem to offer web designers this
> utility for their own server, so I guess you will have to use
> Acrobat's server instead.
>
> Here is how you code your links:
> <a href="HTML/Accessible version of (Document Name).You can try this
> to see how it works with the link below - I've simply selected a
> random tax form to convert from the fedworld.gov site
>
> <http://access.adobe.com/perl/convertPDF.pl?url=http://ftp.fedworld.gov/
> pub/irs-pdf/i1040sc.pdf>
>
> So basically, instead of having to convert 350 documents, by simply
> coding a link to the Acrobat site you will provide on-the-fly
> conversion to anyone who wants it. This has the advantage in that
> you don't need to do repeat conversions when documents change, and
> of course it will be a lot easier for you to code 350 links than run
> that many conversions. Especially since all you have to do is cut
> and paste the string"
> EUDORA="AUTOURL"http://access.adobe.com/perl/convertPDF.pl?url=[full
> path to document]>HTML/Accessible version of (Document Name).</a>
>
> You can try this to see how it works with the link below - I've
> simply selected a random tax form to convert from the fedworld.gov
> site
> <http://access.adobe.com/perl/convertPDF.pl?url=http://ftp.fedworld.
> gov/pub/irs-pdf/i1040sc.pdf>
>
> So basically, instead of having to convert 350 documents, by simply
> coding a link to the Acrobat site you will provide on-the-fly
> conversion to anyone who wants it. This has the advantage in that
> you don't need to do repeat conversions when documents change, and
> of course it will be a lot easier for you to code 350 links than run
> that many conversions. Especially since all you have to do is cut
> and paste the string
> <http://access.adobe.com/perl/convertPDF.pl?url=> and put it in
> front of the existing URL.
>
> Acrobat also offers a free, downloadable accessible reader, Acrobat
> 5.0 with Search and Accessibility.
> <http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/alternate.html#50enu>
>
> It's a 10-meg. download so it is not something that users will
> particularly want to do, but in the long run those who need it are
> going to get it. You can at least offer the link to the reader on
> your site.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org]On
> Behalf Of Charles McCathieNevile
> Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2001 15:20
> To: David Woolley
> Cc: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Site Maps and Screen Readers
>
>
> Acrobat Reader is a browser, although it browses PDF documents, and only
> version 5 (I think) has connectivity for screen readers. But running
> documents through html2ps and opening them in PDF is (admittedly a
> resource-intensive) possibility for getting this functionality in your
> existing system.
>
> Cheers
>
> Charles
>
> On Thu, 9 Aug 2001, David Woolley wrote:
>
>   > A JAWS user I speak to says he is unware of any
>   > functionality that allows him to navigate via
>   > headings.
>
>   Why should this be limited to screen readers?  Amaya is the only
>   browser that I know of that recovers the heading tree (which is not
>   a subset of the document tree).  html2ps (as used to prepare the
>   PDF version of the HTML and CSS2 specs) also does, but isn't a
>   browser.
>
>
> --
> Charles McCathieNevile    http://www.w3.org/People/Charles  phone: +61
> 409 134 136
> W3C Web Accessibility Initiative     http://www.w3.org/WAI    fax: +1
> 617 258 5999
> Location: 21 Mitchell street FOOTSCRAY Vic 3011, Australia
> (or W3C INRIA, Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex,
> France)
>
>
Received on Thursday, 9 August 2001 11:24:35 GMT

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