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Fwd: Web Accessibility Workshop at HFWeb conference in June 2000

From: Wendy A Chisholm <wendy@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 07 Jun 2000 11:03:05 -0400
Message-Id: <4.2.0.58.20000607110140.04d30110@localhost>
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org, webwatch@telelists.com, basr-l@trace.wisc.edu, w3c-wai-gl@w3.org

>         News
>         Release
>
>FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
>
>Contact:
>Cory Knobel
>608.260.9000, ext. 305
>CKnobel@optavia.com <mailto:CKnobel@optavia.com>
>
>
>New Workshop Opens the Internet to More People in More Situations
>Optavia Corporation Announces Web Accessibility Workshop Debuting June 2000
>
>MADISON, WI (May 24, 2000) - Optavia Corporation today announced the first
>public offering of a new web accessibility workshop. The workshop helps
>developers, designers, and managers design web sites that can be used by
>more people in more situations.
>
>“Web Accessibility: More People, More Situations. More Business.” is part of
>a series of tutorials to be held with the HFWeb conference at the University
>of Texas Thompson Conference Center in Austin, TX, on June 19-21, 2000.
>Optavia Corporation also offers the workshop at clients’ sites.
>
>“Web site accessibility is getting more attention with recent regulative and
>legal activities. It is also becoming more visible because of the growing
>number of older Internet shoppers,” says Shawn Henry, director of R&D at
>Optavia Corporation. “There are strong motivations for organizations to
>follow web accessibility guidelines in developing their web sites.”
>
>Henry created the web accessibility workshop with Wendy Chisholm. Chisholm
>is a web accessibility engineer for the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web
>Accessibility Initiative (WAI) (http://www.w3.org/WAI/), and coeditor of the
>Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).
>
>“A primary goal is to make web sites accessible to people with disabilities.
>The beauty of it is that in making web sites more accessible, companies also
>make their web sites better for everybody,” says Henry, an accessibility
>specialist. “The techniques are similar whether the limitation is functional
>or situational, such as listening to a voicing browser read a web page while
>driving a car, or getting instructions from a web site on how to fix
>machinery while in a dark factory.”
>
>For more information about the HFWeb 2000 conference tutorials and to
>register online, see www.optavia.com/events/aus0600.htm.
>
>For information about a web accessibility workshop for your organization,
>contact Paul Cutsforth, Optavia Corporation sales manager, at
>PCutsforth@optavia.com <mailto:PCutsforth@optavia.com>, or 608-260-9000,
>extension 303.
>
>         Optavia Corporation (www.optavia.com) serves the e-commerce 
> industry with
>usability research and consulting for business-to-business,
>business-to-consumer, and intra-company commerce nationwide. The company’s
>customer-centered usability evaluation and web design services benefit
>clients by improving customer interactions online. Using real people and
>real tasks, Optavia Corporation makes technology comfortable.
>
># # #
>____________________________________________________________________________
>______________
>Optavia Corporation  www.optavia.com  613 Williamson Street  Suite 204 
>Madison WI 53703  608.260.9000
Received on Wednesday, 7 June 2000 10:57:00 GMT

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