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RE: Missing criteria from WCAG 2.0?

From: Bailey, Bruce <Bruce.Bailey@ed.gov>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2005 14:19:09 -0500
Message-ID: <CCDBDCBFA650F74AA88830D4BACDBAB50B2D4A4B@wdcrobe2m02.ed.gov>
To: "Guide Lines list" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Cc: "Gregg Vanderheiden" <gv@trace.wisc.edu>

Gregg asked:
> Were there any other non-OS access items?  

Yes, 1194.21(j):
(j) When a product permits a user to adjust color and contrast settings, a variety of color selections capable of producing a range of contrast levels shall be provided.

It is reasonably possible for Java applet or robust Flash object to provide these sorts of controls, not that I have personally encountered such a thing.  However, style sheet selectors on HTML are not exactly rare.

It seems to me that this is not covered by WCAG 2.0 working draft.
But perhaps it doesn't need to be?
Please discuss.


>From guidance documentation at URL:
http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/guide/1194.21.htm#(j)

Do all products have to provide color selections?

No.  This provision is applied to those products that already allow a user to adjust screen colors.

What is the desired outcome of this requirement?

This provision requires more than just providing color choices.  The available choices must also allow for different levels of contrast.  Many people experience a high degree of sensitivity to bright displays.  People with this condition cannot focus on a bright screen for long because they will soon be unable to distinguish individual letters.  An overly bright background causes a visual "white-out".  To alleviate this problem, the user must be able to select a softer background and appropriate foreground colors.  On the other hand, many people with low vision can work most efficiently when the screen is set with very sharp contrast settings.  Because there is such a variance in individual needs it is necessary for a program to have a variety of color and contrast settings.
Received on Monday, 5 December 2005 19:19:26 GMT

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