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Re: XML in HTML

From: Chris Ridpath <chris.ridpath@utoronto.ca>
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2004 09:11:20 -0500
Message-ID: <281b01c4e442$48170860$e29a968e@WILDDOG>
To: "John M Slatin" <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>, "Neil Soiffer" <NeilS@DesSci.com>, <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>

> In my view, the HTML Techniques document
> should include techniques that show how to include
> SVG or MathML (etc.) content in XHTML documents.
>
I don't think this is quite right because it's so open ended. Would the HTML
techniques have to show how to include *all* other technologies? What about
new technologies that come along?

There may be some overlap but I believe that each technology, like SVG or
MathML, describe how it should be included in (X)HTML content.

Cheers,
Chris

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John M Slatin" <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
To: "Chris Ridpath" <chris.ridpath@utoronto.ca>; "Neil Soiffer"
<NeilS@DesSci.com>; <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2004 5:50 PM
Subject: RE: XML in HTML


> Chris Ridpath wrote:
> <blcokquote>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On
> Behalf Of Chris Ridpath
> Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2004 2:59 pm
> To: Neil Soiffer; w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
> Subject: Re: XML in HTML
>
>
>
> > I did a quick look through the techniques document
> > and did not see anything about using non-HTML
> > elements such as MathML, SVG, etc.
> >
> Yes. The HTML techniques document (and test suite) deal with HTML only.
>
> Each technology requires its own techniques. You can find the current
> techniques at: http://www.w3.org/TR/
> </blockquote>
> But there's anotehr issue: In my view, the HTML Techniques document
> should include techniques that show how to include SVG or MathML (etc.)
> content in XHTML documents.  The reason is that there may be cases where
> use of (for example) SVG or MathML is *required* in order to satisfy a
> WCAG 2.0 success criterion.
>
> It would be up to the relevant tech-specific Techniques document to
> provide techniques for making accessible SVG or MathML or whatever; but
> HTML Techniques should show how to incorporate that content into an
> (X)HTML document.
>
> John
>
>
>
> Are you interested in working on the MathML accessibility techniques?
>
> Cheers,
> Chris
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Neil Soiffer" <NeilS@DesSci.com>
> To: <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2004 2:46 PM
> Subject: XML in HTML
>
>
> >
> > In today's techniques phone call, the issue of what happens with
> > MathML inside browsers/user agents that don't support MathML.
> > MathML's <math>
> tag
> > allows for the attributes "altimg" and "alttext".  However, if the
> > user agent doesn't understand MathML (or more generally, any XHTML
> > extension),
> it
> > is not likely to understand that it should use those attributes and so
> they
> > are irrelevent.
> >
> > I did a quick look through the techniques document and did not see
> anything
> > about using non-HTML elements such as MathML, SVG, etc.  Both of these
>
> > and other non HTML extensions (eg, SMIL) are mentioned.  Is this an
> > issue that needs to be addressed?
> >
> > Neil Soiffer                     email: neils@dessci.com
> > Senior Scientist                 phone: 562-433-0685
> > Design Science, Inc.             http://www.dessci.com
> > "How Science Communicates"
> > MathType, WebEQ, MathPlayer, Equation Editor, TeXaide
> >
> >
>
>
Received on Friday, 17 December 2004 14:11:26 GMT

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