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RE: [2.5] Extra succes criterion (non-urgent)

From: Yvette P. Hoitink <y.p.hoitink@heritas.nl>
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 2004 22:28:02 +0100
To: "'Gregg Vanderheiden'" <gv@trace.wisc.edu>, <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-Id: <E1Az0O1-00019i-3f@smtp4.home.nl>

Good point. New proposal:

If a user error is detected in a larger volume of user input, the user can
correct the mistake without having to re-enter 
the input that already was correct, unless keeping the correct content
jeopardizes security.

Still need word smithing. John? :-)

Yvette Hoitink
CEO Heritas, Enschede, the Netherlands
E-mail: y.p.hoitink@heritas.nl 

> 
> Ok EXCEPT FOR SECURITY INFORMATION
> (PASSWORD OR CREDIT CARD NUMBER)
> 
>  
> Gregg
> 
>  -- ------------------------------
> Gregg C Vanderheiden Ph.D. 
> Professor - Ind. Engr. & BioMed Engr.
> Director - Trace R & D Center
> University of Wisconsin-Madison 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org 
> [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Yvette P. Hoitink
> Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 2:31 PM
> To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
> Subject: [2.5] Extra succes criterion (non-urgent)
> 
> 
> Hello everyone, it's me again. 
> 
> Guideline 2.5 says "Help users avoid mistakes and make it 
> easy to correct them". I would like to add another success 
> criteria. Some forms require you to start over again if you 
> make a mistake, because the information you filled in is 
> missing. Especially for people with limited motor functions 
> or other disabilities that slow their navigation in forms, 
> filling out a form can be very time consuming anyway. I think 
> we should add a success criterion to 2.5 to say that where 
> possible you should keep the correct content and only require 
> the user to correct the mistakes. Since this tells authors 
> how to create their content, it would have to be a level 2.
> 
> Proposal:
> 
> Lvl 2 Success criterion:
> If a user error is detected in a larger volume of user input, 
> the user can correct the mistake without having to re-enter 
> the input that already was correct. 
> 
> Who benefits:
> Individuals with severe physical disabilities often need a 
> lot of time to fill in forms. If they can correct the 
> mistakes without having to re-enter all the data, this saves 
> them a lot of effort.
> 
> Example 2: a user form with required fields A user form with 
> required fields checks if the user filled in all the required 
> fields. If not, the user is presented with the same form and 
> is informed which fields are missing. The information that 
> was filled in correctly is still present in the form.
> 
> Yvette Hoitink
> CEO Heritas, Enschede, The Netherlands
> E-mail: y.p.hoitink@heritas.nl
> 
Received on Thursday, 4 March 2004 16:28:06 UTC

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