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RE: Bug #506

From: John M Slatin <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 10:55:34 -0500
Message-ID: <C46A1118E0262B47BD5C202DA2490D1A1E3144@MAIL02.austin.utexas.edu>
To: "Gregg Vanderheiden" <gv@trace.wisc.edu>, <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
    I'm concerned that we're defining "structure" in a way that's still
very HTML-specific.  In the proposal below, I've tried to begin finding
ways of talking about structure for other languages/technologies such as
MathML and SVG.  I very much doubt that I've got it right, but I'm
hoping this will help expand the discussion.  I'll begin with a
proposal, and follow that with a dictionary definition of "structure"
from the online Merriam-Webster dictionary.
 
I've taken a look at the way the SVG spec [1] defines "document
structure," and also at the way the MathML spec [2] talks about what
presentation elements present.
 
<proposed>

structure


Structure refers to the set of elements and relationships that make up a
Web resource.  Elements may contain text, graphics, mathematical
equations, etc. Some elements may contain other elements, and may also
define relationships between two or more elements.   We User agents,
including Web browsers and some assistive technologies, make the
structure of Web resources evident to the user.

 

Some relationships are hierarchical.  For example, an HTML document may
contain multiple sections.  Each section begins with an HTML heading
element (<h1>...<h6>) that contains the title of the section or
sub-section.  The heading element may also show the logical relationship
of one section or sub-section to the sections and sub-sections before
and after it.  

 

In MathML, certain elements are used to show the syntactic structure of
mathematical notation-for example, to make it clear that calculations
have to be performed in a specific order.  In SVG, certain elements
(such as the <g> element) are used to define groups of related graphical
objects and to provide information about the document's structure.

 

Some relationships are non-hierarchical.  For example, non-hierarchical
relationships may be created by links between one part of the document
and another part, or between the document and another resource. 

</proposed>

 


Dictionary definition of structure (included here for informaiton only--
not part of the proposal)


From Merriam-Webster (http://www.m-w.com)

Main Entry: 1struc*ture

Pronunciation: 'str&k-ch&r

Function: noun

Etymology: Middle English, from Latin structura, from structus, past
participle of struere to heap up, build -- more at

STREW

1 : the action of building :

CONSTRUCTION

2 a : something (as a building) that is constructed b : something
arranged in a definite pattern of organization <a rigid totalitarian
structure -- J. L.

Hess> <leaves and other plant structures>

3 : manner of construction :

MAKEUP

<Gothic in structure>

4 a : the arrangement of particles or parts in a substance or body <soil
structure> <molecular structure> b : organization of parts as dominated
by the

general character of the whole <economic structure> <personality
structure>

5 : the aggregate of elements of an entity in their relationships to
each other

 

 

[1] http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/struct.html#Groups

[2] http://www.w3.org/TR/MathML/chapter3.html#id.3.1.1

 

John 

 

 

 
 


"Good design is accessible design." 
Please note our new name and URL!
John Slatin, Ph.D.
Director, Accessibility Institute
University of Texas at Austin
FAC 248C
1 University Station G9600
Austin, TX 78712
ph 512-495-4288, f 512-495-4524
email jslatin@mail.utexas.edu
web http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility/
<http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility/> 


 

-----Original Message-----
From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On
Behalf Of Gregg Vanderheiden
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2004 11:31 pm
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: RE: Bug #506



Hi David,

 

Yes - I know that you didn't edit that part - but when you reposted them
- the other bugs showed up.   So I thought we should clean them up as we
do this.  

 

I think a table is hierarchical (though it is also two (or more)
dimensional).  

What if we just drop the "table" sentence since I don't think we need it
- and no use getting into a bunch of discussion about whether it is
hierarchical or not.  

 

That would leave:

 

 
structure 
 
Structure includes both hierarchical structure of the content and
non-hierarchical relationships such as cross-references.   The
hierarchical
structure of content represents changes in context. For example, a book
is divided into chapters, paragraphs, lists, etc. Chapter titles help
the reader anticipate the meaning of the following paragraphs. Lists
clearly indicate separate, yet related ideas. All of these divisions
help the reader anticipate changes in context.
 
We refer to structure as it is perceived by a User Agent such as a
browser on the client side.
 

 


Gregg

 -- ------------------------------ 
Gregg C Vanderheiden Ph.D. 
Professor - Ind. Engr. & BioMed Engr.
Director - Trace R & D Center 
University of Wisconsin-Madison 

  _____  

From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On
Behalf Of David MacDonald
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2004 12:12 PM
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: RE: Bug #506

 

Gregg says:
 
<gregg>
 
1 - tables are listed as non-hierarchical which is not really best.
Would
suggest tables be moved out from the 'non-hierarchical" category and put
by
themselves in the same sentence.
 
 2 - the picture example may imply that we are requiring that all
pictures be
done in SVG and be fully marked up in hierarchical fashion.   I think
that
example might be better in techniques where it can be explained better
and
looked at as where we want to go someday - not what is required for
level 1
conformance - which is implied by making part of the definition of the
term
used in level 1  
</gregg>
 
 
These two examples were part of the "definition of Structure" before my
action item. I just added a sentence to the end of the definition. But
since I'm here already, here is a repost of my action item with the
above recommendations. The mention of tables and headers might be a bit
HTML specific but since it's in the appendix of definition perhaps its
forgivable.
 
 
structure 
 
Structure includes both hierarchical structure of the content and
non-hierarchical relationships such as cross-references. <new>It also
refers to the
correspondence between header and data cells in a table.</new> The
hierarchical
structure of content represents changes in context. For example,
 
1.      A book is divided into chapters, paragraphs, lists, etc. Chapter
titles help the reader anticipate the meaning of the following
paragraphs.
Lists clearly indicate separate, yet related ideas. All of these
divisions
help the reader anticipate changes in context.
 
<new> [deleted the bicycle image example]</new>
 
<new>We refer to structure as it is perceived by a User Agent such as a
browser on the client side. </new>
 

 
Received on Wednesday, 12 May 2004 11:56:16 GMT

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