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Re: Multiple versions of a page

From: Lisa Seeman <seeman@netvision.net.il>
Date: Fri, 08 Mar 2002 15:00:40 -0800
To: gian@stanleymilford.com.au, "_W3C-WAI Web Content Access. Guidelines List" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-id: <00b001c1c6f5$1231df30$4d95003e@dev1>
Sometimes one item conflicts for different user  gropes
eg: use of jargon (good for some bad for others), more  multimedia  items
less words (see feedback on 3.3 email), using color to emphasize structure
against a black and white page that is good for people without  any cone
vision. etc etc.

Keeping basic accessibility on all accessible renderings but having any
amount of sever side automatic renderings, optimized to different scenarios,
is to me, state of the art accessibility. Have a look at our home page if
you are still not convinced.

All the best,
Lisa
----- Original Message -----
From: <gian@stanleymilford.com.au>
To: <Lee.Otto@aspect.com.au>; <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2002 4:17 PM
Subject: RE: Multiple versions of a page


> Hi,
>
> I think Lee is right, and one major problem with having multiple
> versions of a web page is that we can NEVER know the variety of
> disabilities a person may have, and therefore splitting an accessible
> web site into several sites can end up making that site essentially
> inaccessible. What I mean, is that if someone needs checkpoints A and B
> to access a site will not be able to do so if checkpoint A is solved by
> Site Version 1, and checkpoint B by Site Version 3.
>
> Cheers,
> Gian
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Lee.Otto [mailto:Lee.Otto@aspect.com.au]
> > Sent: Thursday, 7 March 2002 2:56 PM
> > To: w3c-wai-gl
> > Subject: Multiple versions of a page
> >
> >
> > Hi,
> > For some months now I have been reading with great interest
> > the debate that
> > has raged.  Quite frankly I haven't participated before
> > because someone else
> > usually had the same viewpoint.
> >
> > The issue of multiple versions of a page has however seemed
> > to be missing 1
> > point.  If you have already covered this, then I apologise -
> > just ignore
> > this email.   Focusing on abilities is better than focusing
> > on disabilities.
> > It's important to remember that very often particularly if
> > the disability is
> > intellectual or cognitive, that it is accompanied by other
> > disabilities.
> > For example, my son has Down Syndrome, autism, a moderate
> > hearing loss and
> > probably photo-sensitive epilepsy.  He also has no depth
> > perception and
> > requires glasses to read.
> >
> > All I'm really saying is - consider the possibility of more than one
> > disability.  Easier said than done I know - since I don't know how to
> > program for that either.
> >
> > It's nice to finally talk to you all and thank you for the significant
> > effort you are all putting in to helping people like my son.
> >
> > Lee Otto
> >
> > Lee Otto
> > ASPECT
> > Ph: (02) 6245 8133
> > Fax: (02) 6247 7620
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > **************************************************************
> > **********
> > MIMEsweeper has been used to check this email for security
> > **************************************************************
> > **********
> >
> >
>
>
Received on Friday, 8 March 2002 08:08:54 GMT

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