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Re: Illustrating Guidelines

From: Anne Pemberton <apembert@erols.com>
Date: Thu, 10 May 2001 07:26:51 -0400
Message-Id: <3.0.5.32.20010510072651.007c4100@pop.erols.com>
To: love26@gorge.net (William Loughborough), <ryladog@earthlink.net>, "3WC WCAG" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
William,

	I do disagree with you that pictures are less universal than languages. 

	Think about any electric or electronic appliance from your washing machine
to a complex computer system. You can write as many words as you want to
indicate what you want the appliance to do, but until a designer reduces
all your words to a picture/s, the circuit boards that control behavior
cannot be manufactured. 

	The notion that text is superior to illustrations is a false pride
engendered by a desire to separate users into those worthy of receiving the
message and those who are unworthy. Ther should be no distinctions of
worthiness in accessibility.

					Anne

At 08:43 PM 5/9/01 -0700, William Loughborough wrote:
>At 10:59 PM 5/9/01 -0400, Katie Haritos-Shea wrote:
>>Aren't pictures and symbols more universal, understood by more people 
>>around the world, than a single language?
>
>IMO, No.
>
>KH:: "They are already there in universal symbols on signs all around the 
>world..."
>
>WL: They're not really universal. Perhaps there will be something that 
>realizes Bliss' dreams of his symbols becoming a universal language but 
>we're not even close yet.
>
>--
>Love.
>                 ACCESSIBILITY IS RIGHT - NOT PRIVILEGE
>
>
Anne Pemberton
apembert@erols.com

http://www.erols.com/stevepem
http://www.geocities.com/apembert45
Received on Thursday, 10 May 2001 07:18:42 GMT

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