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Comments on WAI guidelines

From: John T. Whelan <whelan@physics.utah.edu>
Date: Wed, 9 Sep 1998 15:58:34 -0600
Message-Id: <199809092158.PAA18114@cpt14.physics.utah.edu>
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Technique A.1.6
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/wai-gl-techniques-19980908.html#avoid-ascii-art>
says:

>However, if ascii art must be used, mark it up as such:
>
>Example. 
>
><SPAN class="smile" title="smiley in ascii art">:-)</SPAN>
>
>End example.

	The problem is that there is no ALT attribute defined for SPAN
in the HTML4.0 spec, so this example violates guideline C.4.1.  I
suppose a long-term solution for someone who wants to create ASCII art
for text users (for example if they can't or don't want to generate an
image) with alternate content for blind users would be something like

<OBJECT DATA="cow.txt" TYPE="text/x-ascii-art" TITLE="drawing of a cow">
Cow
</OBJECT>

Recommendation A.2
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WD-WAI-PAGEAUTH#A2>
Technique 1 says:

>     Until most browsers support "longdesc", also use d-links (or invisible
>      d-links). [Priority 1] 

	What's an invisible d-link?  The Techiques document
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/wai-gl-techniques-19980908.html#img-dlink>
only defines a d-link, not an invisible one.

					John T. Whelan
					whelan@iname.com
					http://www.slack.net/~whelan/
Received on Wednesday, 9 September 1998 17:58:12 GMT

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