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Re: Ref card - draft intro & closing

From: Mike Paciello <paciello@yuri.org>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 1998 01:29:43 -0400
Message-Id: <199809170529.BAA17371@strato-fe0.ultra.net>
To: Judy Brewer <jbrewer@w3.org>, w3c-wai-eo@w3.org
I'm sorry, but some of the wording below puzzles me. For example:

"Having an accessible Web site means that your site can be used by millions
more people around the world, and that it will also work better for
everyone -- for instance people with mobile devices, lack of audio output,
or low bandwith."

1. Doesn't the fact that a site that can be used by "millions more people"
imply that it must also work better for everyone? I understand the point
you're trying to make -- accessibility benefits everyone, regardless of
ability or situation. But somehow the current wording seems awkward. I
think there are two statements enveloped in one and that's making it a
little harder to understand. Perhaps something similar to:

"Having an accessible Web site means that your site will perform (or
process) better for millions more people around the world including persons
with disabilities, people with mobile devices, users with low bandwith and
individuals without audio output."  

If there's room, you could make a bulleted list that includes the 4
population segments.

2. Shouldn't we add the word "the" before "W3C's" in the final paragraph?
Remove the comma after "techniques" or just make a small list. For example,
"ideas, techniques and tips for testing your site...."

Nothing critical --- sorry if I interrupted the workflow.

Regards,

Mike

At 11:51 PM 9/16/98 -0400, Judy Brewer wrote:
>Draft intro & closing paragraphs for business-card sized reference card:
>
>[Well, here is one of my action items that's been pending a bit!]
>
>[Intro]
>
>Make Your Web Site Accessible:
>Here are some tips from the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web
>Accessibility Initiative (WAI) on how to make your Web site accessible for
>people with disabilities. Having an accessible Web site means that your
>site can be used by millions more people around the world, and that it will
>also work better for everyone -- for instance people with mobile devices,
>lack of audio output, or low bandwidth. Try these for starters: 
>
>[the mini-guidelines go here...]
>
>[Closing]
>
>Interested in learning more? Come to W3C's WAI home page, at
>http://www.w3.org/WAI, and follow links to the WAI Page Author Guidelines.
>You'll find specific ideas and techniques, and tips for testing your site
>to make sure everyone can use it. You'll also find information about other
>WAI activities and resources.
> 
>
>----------
>Judy Brewer    jbrewer@w3.org    +1.617.258.9741    http://www.w3.org/WAI
>Director, Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) International Program Office
>World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
>MIT/LCS Room NE3-355, 545 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA
> 

Mike Paciello                    Email: <paciello@ma.ultranet.com>
WebABLE! Solutions         Tel: (603) 598-9544 
131 D.W. Highway #618     Fax: (603) 598-2839 
Nashua, NH 03060             WWW: <http:://www.webable.com>

"A creativity initiative is any proposal for action-inciting change that earns
at least one serious conversation with someone other than the originator’s
spouse, friend, or office mate…." – John Kao, Jamming  
Received on Thursday, 17 September 1998 01:28:54 GMT

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