W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > semantic-web@w3.org > November 2006

geo:lat owl:samePropertyAs vcard:latitude? (vCard/RDF)

From: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2006 09:51:23 -0600
To: semantic-web@w3.org
Message-Id: <1164124283.3997.422.camel@dirk>

Harry, Brian, Norm, DanBri,

So we have another pair of URIs for latitude/longitude:

 http://www.w3.org/2006/vcard/ns#latitude
 http://www.w3.org/2006/vcard/ns#longitude

Is it worth maintaining those URIs in addition to these?
  http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#lat
  http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#long

I suggest not. I suggest obsoleting 2006/vcard/ns#latitude
in favor of 2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#lat .

As a test case, we could use
  http://microformats.org/tests/hcard/25-geo-abbr.html
Hmm... trying that with hcard2rdf.xsl (1.3 2006/11/14)
I see that it doesn't grok the relevant abbreviation.
Is that by design? So many details...

As a second choice, I suggest putting 3 triples per
property in both schemas:
(1) for the OWL-knowledgeable:
  geo:lat owl:samePropertyAs vcard:latitude.
and (2) for agents that know only RDFS:
 geo:lat rdfs:subPropertyOf vcard:latitude.
 vcard:latitude rdfs:subPropertyOf geo:lat.

Perhaps likewise for vcard:Location and geo:Point;
I'm not sure.


I wonder what social process these terms are ultimately
grounded in... I think both vcard and the 2003/01/geo
spec normatively cite WGS84... hmm... no, RFC2426 doesn't
defer to any other spec for lat/long

http://www.w3.org/2002/12/cal/rfc2426#sec3.4.2

It's RFC2445 were I saw the normative reference...
[[
   With the exception of the special condition described above, this
   form is specified in Department of Commerce, 1986, Representation of
   geographic point locations for information interchange (Federal
   Information Processing Standard 70-1):  Washington,  Department of
   Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology.
]]
http://www.w3.org/2002/12/cal/rfc2445#sec4.8.1.6

and I think I did some spelunking and found that this FIPS spec
is a thin layer over WGS84.

Oddly, 2003/01/geo doesn't seem to cite any definition either.

Wikipedia cites a NIMA tech report... eek... it's only good
thru 2010?!? I wonder if the process for the next version is
rolling yet.

[[
The World Geodetic System defines a fixed global reference frame for the
Earth, for use in geodesy and navigation. The latest revision is WGS 84
dating from 1984 (last revised in 2004), which will be valid up to about
2010.

...

NIMA Technical Report TR8350.2 Department of Defense World Geodetic
System 1984, Its Definition and Relationships With Local Geodetic
Systems, Third Edition, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. This is
the official publication of the standard, including addenda.
]]
 -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Geodetic_System


-- 
Dan Connolly, W3C http://www.w3.org/People/Connolly/
D3C2 887B 0F92 6005 C541  0875 0F91 96DE 6E52 C29E
Received on Tuesday, 21 November 2006 15:51:38 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 26 March 2013 21:45:12 GMT