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Re: quote use case

From: Rajesh Koilpillai <rajesh@infravio.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Jun 2003 19:36:55 +0530
Message-ID: <3EE7377F.4020201@infravio.com>
To: public-ws-chor@w3.org

Can you resend the request quote.htm, the figures seems to be missing.

Thanks,
- Rajesh Koilpillai

Len_Greski@grainger.com wrote:

>The attached HTML document includes a use case for our consideration in
>defining the choreography specification. The use case describes a Buyer
>requesting a quote from a Supplier, where the Supplier interacts with
>Manufacturers who make the products.
>__________________________________
>Len Greski
>Director, Architecture & Development
>W.W. Grainger, eBusiness Division
>voice: (847) 793-5185
>fax: (847) 793-5019
>cell: (847) 366-1376
>mailto:greski.l@grainger.com
>
>(See attached file: request quote.htm)
>  
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>   1. Name
>
> Request quote: Buyer requests quote for products from a Supplier.
>
>
>   2. Actors
>
> Buyer
>
> 	
>
> Role that requests a quote from the supplier
>
> Supplier
>
> 	
>
> Role that provides products / services for the Buyer to purchase 
> directly, potentially aggregating products from one or more manufacturers.
>
> Manufacturer
>
> 	
>
> Role that makes one or more products that are covered in a request for 
> quotation from the Buyer. The Manufacturer role does not have a direct 
> relationship with the Buyer.
>
>
>   3. Description
>
> The request quote from Supplier use case describes a situation where a 
> Supplier and one or more Manufacturers collaborate to provide pricing 
> and availability on a set of products requested by the Buyer. From a 
> web services choreography perspective, the use case illustrates some 
> of the key features that must be accounted for in the choreography, 
> including:
>
>     * Contract provisions, including
>           o Start & end times when contract is valid (e.g. how long is
>             the quote valid?)
>           o Renewal policies
>           o Responsibilities for each party (i.e. CRCs for each role)
>     * Service level agreements
>           o Response time
>           o Service availability
>     * Security provisions
>     * Privacy provisions
>     * Non-repudiation
>     * Escalation procedures
>     * Exception handling
>
> The use case also demonstrates a basic flow of interaction between two 
> web services: negotiate contract, negotiate interface, exchange data, 
> execute transaction, and return results.
>
> Figure 1: Interaction between services
>
>
>   4. Preconditions
>
> Supplier has a defined interface for quoting items it supplies to Buyers.
>
> Buyer knows Supplier item identifiers for items requested for quotation.
>
> Metadata required to negotiate contract is known by the Supplier, and 
> available to the Buyer.
>
>
>   5. Triggering Event(s)
>
> Buyer has list of products for which a quote is to be requested, and 
> the product identifiers are understandable by the supplier.
>
>
>   6. Postconditions
>
> Buyer receives a quote for products requested from supplier, including 
> pricing and availability.
>
> Quote conforms to contract specifications.
>
> Contract specifications are saved by Supplier and Buyer.
>
> Supplier has commitments to receive product from Manufacturer(s), per 
> Buyer’s requirements.
>
>
>   7. Flow of Events
>
>
>     7.1. Basic Flow (Primary Scenario)
>
> In the primary scenario, the contractual relationships between 
> Supplier and Manufacturer roles are already in place.
>
>
>       7.1.1. Flow steps
>
> 1. Buyer sends contract requirements to Supplier
>
> 2. Supplier approves contract requirements for the quote, and returns 
> approval to the Buyer. Where terms are disputed, Supplier offers 
> counter-terms
>
> 3. Buyer accepts contract terms returned by Supplier, and requests 
> interface information from Supplier
>
> 4. Supplier returns interface information to Buyer
>
> 5. Buyer generates a quote request, conforming to Supplier’s interface 
> specification, and submits it to Supplier
>
> 6. Supplier determines the Manufacturers that will be used to fulfill 
> the quote based on existing knowledge about Manufacturer(s) ability to 
> meet Buyer specifications, creates price and availability requests for 
> each Manufacturer, and submits them to the Manufacturer(s)
>
> 7. Manufacturer(s) provide price and availability information for 
> items in the price and availability request, and returns to Supplier
>
> 8. The Supplier identifies whether all items requested in the quote by 
> the Buyer have at least one Manufacturer able to deliver product. 
> Supplier reviews responses from Manufacturer(s), determining which 
> items to include from each Manufacturer in the response to Buyer. The 
> Supplier builds the quote, and returns it to Buyer. The response 
> includes items requested, items quoted, and items not quoted, price, 
> and availability.
>
>
>       7.1.2. Sequence Diagram
>
> Figure 2: request quote event sequence
>
>
>     7.2. Alternate Flow(s)
>
> Alternate Scenario: contractual relationships between Supplier and 
> Manufacturer roles do not exist prior to start of use case. This will 
> be documented as a separate use case.
>
>
>       7.2.1. Step 2: alternatives
>
> The Supplier may reject one or more terms requested by the Buyer. To 
> handle the negotiation of terms, there may be multiple request / 
> response sequences between Buyer and Supplier.
>
>
>       7.2.2. Step 5: alternatives
>
> Buyer is unable to provide information in the format specified by the 
> Supplier’s interface. Use case ends.
>
>
>       7.2.3. Step 7: alternatives
>
> Manufacturer is unable to commit to delivering items requested in the 
> quote, and declines to provide price and availability for one or more 
> items.
>
>
>   8. Related Use Cases
>
> For the purpose of illustrating relationships between use cases, the 
> Supplier role is represented by the use cases, not as a separate actor 
> as we have documented above.
>
> Figure 3: request quote event sequence
>
>
>   9. Notes / Issues
>
> 1. Need to distinguish the idea of a contract between services (e.g. 
> the equivalent of CRCs) from a legal contract.
>
> 2. Need additional detail about what happens with the agreed to 
> contract provisions.
>
Received on Wednesday, 11 June 2003 10:55:18 GMT

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