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[whatwg] The truth about Nokias claims

From: Joseph Daniel Zukiger <joseph_daniel_zukiger@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Dec 2007 01:20:01 -0800 (PST)
Message-ID: <846886.4563.qm@web60712.mail.yahoo.com>

> > (4) Allow the requirement of (1) to be waived, or
> > commuted to the next best thing available under
> RAND
> > terms in the event that there are no
> implementations
> > not known to be encumbered.
> 
> The codec required must be specified explicitly by
> name, otherwise the
> online world will go apart.  The statements above do
> not make a good
> solution because they are not precise enough.

I may be wrong, but I think you are asking more than
is possible of the processes going on here. 

> > PS: 
> > (5) Take this issue to the US Congress to explain
> how
> > "strong" "IP" laws actually do interfere with
> > innovation by anyone but 800 ton^H^H^H pound
> gorillas.
> 
> Do you think we have a representative among us? 
> Besides, I think they
> are smart enough to know that.  It does not help
> much because they are
> "encumbered" themselves.  Make a donation to
> nosoftwarepatents.org and
> stop bringing it up here.

And I think you have a basic misunderstanding of the
democratic process in the US. 

We don't need a representative among us. If their is a
US citizen among us who agrees with my assertion that
the flame war here demonstrates the evil effect of the
patent office's current practices, that person can
write or e-mail his representative and/or senator. It
often takes a certain amount of persistence and maybe
a bit of creativity to get past some of their office
staff, and to be noticed in the noise, but it can be
done.

Now, if no one does such a thing, the members of
Congress, not being technically qualified themselves,
don't have a basis for understanding the technical
impact of the laws they create. They do have members
of the industry constantly giving them incomplete or
even wrong information in an effort to bias the laws
in favor of their own companies or states/communities
or other "special interest group". 

So, no, donating money to any or all the several
political action and legal support groups that are
developing to undo the damage done by the current
patent process is not enough. US citizens need to
voice their opinions. The more who do so, the better
chance there is of getting someone's attention on
capitol hill. So, unless there are no US citizens
reading this list, I think it is useful to voice
encouragement to use those processes constructively
here.

(It would be quite cynical of any US citizen who
understands the political processes to assert that
this isn't the place for such comments.)

 joudanzuki



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Received on Sunday, 16 December 2007 01:20:01 UTC

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