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Re: Enabling a Web app to override auto rotation?

From: Jordan Dobson <jordandobson@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2012 23:29:22 -0800
Message-ID: <CAPe1mCEaxHEVM3u2q4PO-ue31-nYcetYVaQOFyV8Y3amzODRWQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: timeless <timeless@gmail.com>
Cc: "public-webapps@w3.org" <public-webapps@w3.org>
One way people do this today already is to use media queries to hide the UI
when it's rotated into an orientation they don't support.

Example:

* http://mrgan.com/pieguy/
* http://cl.ly/E5fw
* http://cl.ly/E56V

Hope this helps if anyone is looking to do anything similar in the near
future.

- Jordan

On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 9:28 PM, timeless <timeless@gmail.com> wrote:

> Personally I consider this a QoI issue for UAs.
>
> There will be lots of web pages that won't support / use this
> auto-rotation suppressor. UAs will need and want to let their users
> deal with this.
>
> The BlackBerry PlayBook for instance has an item for it: swipe in from
> top right corner, tap the orientation widget, select lock orientation,
> tap the application  content area, move on with life.
>
> I'm not saying it's perfect, and I've been planning to write out more
> detailed proposals for more advanced things, but sometimes adding a
> web-API doesn't really help the user. This isn't a web page problem,
> it's a system problem, and the user will benefit from having a
> *single* and *consistent* method for addressing it across all
> applications, native, web, and web written by other people who decide
> to put buttons and widgets in places the user won't expect.
>
> Disclaimer: while my employer isn't endorsing my opinion, I'm happy to
> use its products.
>
> On 2/8/12, Tobie Langel <tobie@fb.com> wrote:
> > The general use case is any UI that's been designed exclusively for
> > portrait or landscape mode because displaying it in the other mode either
> > doesn't make any sense (e.g. most platform games), requires some artifice
> > that the designer wanted to avoid (e.g. to function in landscape mode,
> > e-readers rely on the book metaphor), or isn't cost effective (i.e. it
> > requires designing two radically different UIs instead of one).
> >
> > --tobie
> >
> > On 2/8/12 9:16 AM, "Marcos Caceres" <w3c@marcosc.com> wrote:
> >
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>On Wednesday, 8 February 2012 at 07:39, Charles Pritchard wrote:
> >>
> >>> In case it's needed; use case:
> >>>
> >>> User is drawing a sketch on their mobile phone and their rotation is
> >>>intentional as if they are working with a physical piece of paper.
> >>or a car game where the driving is controlled by how much the device is
> >>rotated (you want the orientation locked, probably to landscape)Š There
> >>are other games, like Rolando [1], that make use of both portrait,
> >>landscape, and a kind of "fixed mode"Š where the orientation is "fixed"
> >>no matter what way you rotate the screen (think of rotating a video
> >>cameraŠ the world in the view finder stays "fixed")
> >>
> >>[1] http://rolando.ngmoco.com/
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
> Sent from my mobile device
>
>


-- 
Jordan Dobson • Designer / Developer • 425-444-8014 • JordanDobson.com
Received on Friday, 10 February 2012 07:31:22 GMT

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