W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-tracking@w3.org > October 2012

Re: Issue-5: What is the definition of tracking?

From: John Simpson <john@consumerwatchdog.org>
Date: Tue, 2 Oct 2012 11:47:52 -0700
Message-Id: <639CFE17-274E-40C2-95A0-9AEC88E64C6E@consumerwatchdog.org>
Cc: "public-tracking@w3.org (public-tracking@w3.org)" <public-tracking@w3.org>
To: "Roy T. Fielding" <fielding@gbiv.com>
I would want to include collection and correlation of data by the first party in the definition of tracking.  I would then specifically enumerate which tracking activities would be permissible under the standard for the first party.

John M. Simpson
Consumer Advocate
Consumer Watchdog
2701 Ocean Park Blvd., Suite 112
Santa Monica, CA,90405
Tel: 310-392-7041
Cell: 310-292-1902

On Oct 2, 2012, at 4:58 AM, Roy T. Fielding wrote:

> On Oct 1, 2012, at 5:43 PM, John Simpson wrote:
>> Nonetheless, here is a proposed definition of tracking, with which I could live:
>> "Tracking is the collection and correlation of data about the Internet activities of a particular user, computer, or device, over time and across a website or websites."
> Not bad, but I think we should try to exclude functionality within a
> single first-party context.  I ran across another definition yesterday:
> http://blog.privacychoice.org/2011/03/22/a-working-definition-of-do-not-track/
>  "The non-consensual use or transfer
>   of behavioral data collected
>   across websites or applications
>   as to an individual, computer or device."
> which I think is pretty close, but the wording is tortuous.
> How about:
> "Tracking is any non-consensual collection, correlation, or transfer of
> data about the Internet activities of a particular user, user agent, or
> device beyond the (first party) context in which that activity occurred."
> Cheers,
> ....Roy
Received on Tuesday, 2 October 2012 18:47:52 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Wednesday, 7 January 2015 14:41:16 UTC