W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-tracking@w3.org > November 2011

Re: User intended interactions [1st & 3rd Parties]

From: Carmen Balber <carmen@consumerwatchdog.org>
Date: Wed, 09 Nov 2011 12:21:15 -0500
To: "public-tracking@w3.org" <public-tracking@w3.org>
Message-ID: <CAE020BB.3DE01%carmen@consumerwatchdog.org>

> 9. A user sees an advertisement for Chips Ahoy cookies. The user wants
> to buy some cookies, so they click the ad. The Nabisco is a first party.
> Nabisco may have hired many advertising companies as vendors.
In this case, the advertising company that delivered the ad is still third
party, correct?

> 10. A user sees a tweet which says "Check out this awesome NYT article
> bit.ly/1234". The user clicks the link, expecting to be redirected by
> bitly to the New York Times. Twitter, bitly and the New York Times are
> all first parties to this interaction.
What if the user clicks a hyperlink without the bit.ly address spelled out?
User has no reason to know bit.ly is involved, and bit.ly should be a 3rd
party. Also agree that URL shorteners in general are a tricky case - it
seems pretty sneaky for bitly to be a 1st party.

> 11. A user sees a tweet which says "Check out this awesome NYT article
> nyti.ms/1234". The user recognizes that that this is a link to the New
> York Times, but doesn't know that the New York Times has hired bit.ly to
> do URL shortening. The user clicks the link, expecting to be redirected
> by a shortener to the New York Times. Twitter and the New York Times are
> all first parties to this interaction. bit.ly is a service provider for
> the New York times.
> 12. A user clicks a links which says "Awesome NYT Article" and points to
> framing.com/nyt1234. This page loads nothing but a frame which contains
> a New York Times article, but all links are rewritten to pass through
> framing.com rather than pointing at other NYT articles. The New York
> Times is a first party. Framing.com is a third party.
How is the NYT a first party in this case, if the user never goes to their
site?

> 13. The user clicks one of these links to go to another NYT artcile, and
> gets directed to framing.com/nyt1235. The New York Times is a first
> party. Framing.com is a third party.
> 

-- 
Carmen Balber
Washington Director
Consumer Watchdog
413 E. Capitol St. SE, 1st Floor
Washington, D.C  20003
p:(202) 629-3043
http://www.consumerwatchdog.org
Received on Wednesday, 9 November 2011 17:21:53 UTC

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