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[Bug 13392] i18n-ISSUE-72: BOM as preferred encoding declaration

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2011 20:11:34 +0000
To: public-i18n-core@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1QsKYQ-0000sh-NS@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=13392

--- Comment #17 from Leif Halvard Silli <xn--mlform-iua@xn--mlform-iua.no> 2011-08-13 20:11:34 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #16)
> (In reply to comment #15)

> >  -Webkit = ISO-8859-5

> (Btw, also related:  https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=66056)

See comment number 13: <https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=66056#c13>

As it turns out, if a Polyglot Markup file is interpreted as XHTML, and is the
subframe of an HTML page, then Webkit (including Chrome) as well as Opera
currently inherits the encoding of the "mother" HTML page. 

TESTS:

* HTML (Win-1252) file with polyglot subframe (w/HTML encoding declaration):
   http://malform.no/testing/html5/bom/frame

* HTML (Win-1252) file with polyglot subframe (w/HTTP charset):
   http://malform.no/testing/html5/bom/frame2

* HTML (Win-1252) file with polyglot subframe (w/BOM):
   http://malform.no/testing/html5/bom/frame3


Only the BOM file works 100% reliably. E.g. if you manually change the encoding
of the HTML file, then Webkit/Chrome/Opera will override the encoding - except
if you have the BOM, then Webkit/Chrome won't do that.

Of course, the Webkit/Chrome/Opera behaviour is bogus.

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