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Re: Change Proposal for ISSUE-101 (us-ascii-ref)

From: Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>
Date: Mon, 08 Mar 2010 13:35:37 -0800
Cc: HTML WG <public-html@w3.org>
Message-id: <A8864BAB-2CB1-4969-8A87-016D1A1A9BDC@apple.com>
To: Julian Reschke <julian.reschke@gmx.de>

Recorded: <http://dev.w3.org/html5/status/issue-status.html#ISSUE-0101>

On Mar 3, 2010, at 9:07 AM, Julian Reschke wrote:

> SUMMARY
>
> RFC 1345 does not define the US-ASCII encoding, it just registers  
> the name of the encoding.
>
> RATIONALE
>
> When referencing US-ASCII, the spec should actually reference a  
> document that defines US-ASCII.
>
> RFC 1345 is a non-maintained, historic, informational RFC that's not  
> really a definition for ASCII. As far as I can tell, there's not a  
> single RFC that has been published in the last 20 years that uses  
> RFC 1345 to reference ASCII (I just searched, and couldn't find any).
>
> Confirmed in a discussion on the ietf hybi mailing list by various  
> long-term IETF contributors, including Martin Dürst, IETF Charset  
> Reviewer ([1]).
>
> DETAILS
>
> Use a reference to the ANSI or ISO spec that actually defines ASCII,  
> such as
>
>   [ANSI.X3-4.1986]  American National Standards Institute, "Coded
>                     Character Set - 7-bit American Standard Code for
>                     Information Interchange", ANSI X3.4, 1986.
>
> (taken from the relatively recent RFC 5322).
>
>
> IMPACT
>
> 1. Positive Effects
>
> The spec actually references what it's supposed to reference.
>
> 2. Negative Effects
>
> None.
>
> 3. Conformance Classes Changes
>
> None.
>
> 4. Risks
>
> None.
>
>
> REFERENCES
>
> [1] <http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/hybi/current/msg01154.html>
>
Received on Monday, 8 March 2010 21:36:10 UTC

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