W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html@w3.org > January 2010

Re: New split-out drafts vs. modular design

From: Shelley Powers <shelley.just@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 08:48:29 -0600
Message-ID: <643cc0271001110648k70bc72b4y5c1b14eb75ae4491@mail.gmail.com>
To: Lachlan Hunt <lachlan.hunt@lachy.id.au>
Cc: "public-html@w3.org" <public-html@w3.org>
On Mon, Jan 11, 2010 at 3:28 AM, Lachlan Hunt <lachlan.hunt@lachy.id.au> wrote:
> Shelley Powers wrote:
>>
>> If the WhatWG wants to create something called Web Applications 1.0,
>> and include the HTML5 document in it, with the others, there
>> shouldn't be any confusion. It would help if the WhatWG folks point
>> out the W3C counter-parts,
>
> That's already been done.
>
> http://wiki.whatwg.org/wiki/FAQ#What_are_the_various_versions_of_the_spec.3F
>
> And this page attempts to show their relationship to one another
> http://www.whatwg.org/specs/diagram.html
>
>> It would also help if the WhatWG folks pointed people to our bug
>> databases,
>
> The WHATWG copy of the spec already includes the quick bug reporting tool
> script, which does indeed allow readers to submit bugs to the W3C bugzilla
> instance.
>
>> since we seem to have a change procedure in place (the
>> WhatWG does not). And it would ensure that all bugs are tracked in
>> one place--something I would think we would all want.
>
> The WHATWG has operated for years without having to adopt a formal change
> procedure like we have here because the group is not as dysfunctional this
> one.
>

I don't believe this comment is appropriate.

The W3C HTML WG is attempting to ensure that everyone's interests are
met, as much as possible. That means this effort consists of members
of many different audiences, all with dependencies on HTML. And all of
whom are not going to agree all the time.

The WhatWG is focused at a very homogenous audience with no real
procedure in place to allow others from outside this audience to have
any say or input. It consists of Ian making or not making edits, based
on what the people who think very much like him, say or don't say.

The accessibility community has absolutely no real say in the group,
and frankly, I don't see that the HTML authoring or tools groups do
either.

When you have a self-forming group that limits membership and gives
complete control over to one editor, you don't have disagreement and
content. Or, if you do, you ignore it.

When you have a group, though, that is attempting to meet the needs of
many HTML communities, you will have disagreement, and you will need
to resolve it.

> --
> Lachlan Hunt - Opera Software

Shelley
>
Received on Monday, 11 January 2010 14:49:03 UTC

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