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Re: LONGDESC: some current problems and a proposed solution added to the wiki

From: Peter Krantz <peter.krantz@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Jul 2007 12:17:21 +0200
Message-ID: <7b9ad66d0707010317v1635e6dlda46103cc7dd8ada@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Philip TAYLOR" <Philip-and-LeKhanh@royal-tunbridge-wells.org>
Cc: "HTML WG" <public-html@w3.org>

On 7/1/07, Philip TAYLOR <Philip-and-LeKhanh@royal-tunbridge-wells.org> wrote:
>
> The first two <p>s would better have been *<sentence>s, if
> such an element existed.  The last is not even that, and
> would need to be a *<phrase> (all off-topic, of course,
> but I do think it's helpful if example markup is not so
> obviously flawed that one feels the urge to respond to it
> before responding to the point in question).

Please. I am trying to show that various elements can be contained
inside the picture element without resorting to writing too much text
which would obfuscate the example. Can you imagine that the paragraphs
were longer and had more content to justify the p element?

>
> Why would a blind person want to hear (is  there were a sense-neutral
> verb one that one can use in place of "see" and "hear" ?) the same
> prose twice, once as mainstream copy and once as fallback text?
>

My point exactly.

> I think there /is/ an important point here, but it's simply
> not coming across.  The real point at issue here is, I think,
> "How is someone with visual impairment to know that two
> elements on a page bear a relationship to each other,
> and if so, what that relationship is?".

Yes. But not only users with a visual impairment. As I mentioned
earlier, the relationship between an image and the descriptive content
could be valuable for makers of search engines and in scripting
scenarios.

Regards,

Peter
Received on Sunday, 1 July 2007 10:17:27 UTC

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