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RE: HTML/XML TF report introductory text

From: Robert Leif <rleif@rleif.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 14:10:30 -0700
To: "'Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis'" <bhawkeslewis@googlemail.com>
Cc: "'Noah Mendelsohn'" <nrm@arcanedomain.com>, "'Henri Sivonen'" <hsivonen@iki.fi>, <public-html-xml@w3.org>
Message-ID: <11f401cc8dda$60e948f0$22bbdad0$@rleif.com>
To: Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis
Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) Picture Archiving (PACs) using Web Access to. DICOM Persistent Objects (WADO) are able to return and save data in XML format. Health Level 7 Version 3 is XML. Many databases have XML front ends. A huge amount of data is or will be saved in XML. This includes patient medical records. The efficient  use of a browser to present this data and forms to enter and retrieve this data would save simplify and significantly reduce the costs of creating applications. The present capabilities of HTML5 permit it to be used as a portable API. In the case of scientific and technical communications, the integration of movies, vector graphics, data, hypertext, and mathematical formulas would simplify the production and distribution of complex documents. It would be very competitive with PDF. If you desire to see my candidates for use with HTML5, please visit www.CytometryML.org and look at the XML documents.
I believe the simplest and most powerful approach is to use the browser with any HTML5-XML combined application. This means that the xml web page need only be validated with xml tools. As I have previously stated, any changes to HTML5 should be limited to XHTML5. This should avoid or at least minimize the effect of any changes to produce a functional XHTML5 that interoperates with XML. As I have previously stated, there are two levels of interoperability. The first is the XHTML5 and XML elements ignore each other. This functionality already exist in xsd1.1             
 <xs:openContent mode="interleave">
        <xs:any namespace="http://schemas.microsoft.com/intellisense/html-5" processContents="strict"/>
 </xs:openContent>

Could the equivalent of this be included in XHTML5? I would like the openContent element to have two variants: the first is like XSD1.1. If it is in the namespace, it is invisible to XHTML5. The second variant concerns prefixes. It is possible to create XML that is syntactically identical with HTML except some of the elements have prefixes. These prefixes tell the system that the XML element is really not the same as the HTML element. Therefore the browser is prevented from performing a specific action, such as showing an image. The browser needs to know to ignore these prefixes and to perform the operation that has been coded.
Yours,
Bob Leif

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis [mailto:bhawkeslewis@googlemail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2011 10:06 AM
To: rleif@rleif.com
Cc: Noah Mendelsohn; Henri Sivonen; public-html-xml@w3.org
Subject: Re: HTML/XML TF report introductory text

On Wed, Oct 12, 2011 at 7:18 PM, Robert Leif <rleif@rleif.com> wrote:
> I believe that the concern about the lack of interoperability between HTML5 and XML is of great significance. This should have been a major requirement for the development of HTML5.

Why?

> The inability to use XML elements in HTML5 will result in very significant costs.

What costs? Why?

> An HTML5-XML interface could be a very important part of the informatics backbone of Obama Care. The data entry for personal healthcare records would be simplified by the use of HTML5 forms that filled in the XML records.

What does the "use of HTML5 forms that filled in the XML records"
mean, precisely?

> The creation of structured reports in Radiology and Pathology would simplified is one could directly use the XML data and the formatting via CSS that is available with HTML5.

Can you give real-world markup examples that illustrate how you see this working?

--
Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis
Received on Tuesday, 18 October 2011 21:11:06 GMT

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