W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html-commits@w3.org > July 2009

html5/markup meter.html,1.11,1.12 spec.html,1.64,1.65

From: Michael Smith via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 07:42:44 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1MW3oC-0006y3-HK@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/html5/markup
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv26632

Modified Files:
	meter.html spec.html 
Log Message:
made refinements to documentation for <meter>


Index: meter.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/markup/meter.html,v
retrieving revision 1.11
retrieving revision 1.12
diff -u -d -r1.11 -r1.12
--- meter.html	29 Jul 2009 07:19:23 -0000	1.11
+++ meter.html	29 Jul 2009 07:42:42 -0000	1.12
@@ -13,7 +13,11 @@
 </div>
 <div id="meter" class="section">
       <h2 class="element-head"><span class="element">meter</span> &#8211; <span class="shortdesc">scalar gauge</span> <a class="hash" href="#meter">#</a> <a class="toc-bak" href="Overview.html#meter-toc">T</a></h2>
-      <div id="meter-longdesc" class="longdesc"><p><i class="TK">(element description to come)</i></p></div>
+      <div id="meter-longdesc" class="longdesc">
+    <p>The <a href="meter.html#meter" class="element">meter</a> element
+    represents a scalar gauge providing a measurement within a
+    known range, or a fractional value.</p>
+  </div>
       <div class="no-number no-toc" id="meter-content">
         <h2 class="element-subhead">Content model <a class="hash" href="#meter-content">#</a></h2>
         <div class="content-models" id="meter-mdls">
@@ -39,32 +43,66 @@
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.value" title="meter.attrs.value" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.value">value</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>Specifies the value to have the gauge indicate as the
+        &#8220;measured&#8221; value.</dd>
           
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.min" title="meter.attrs.min" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.min">min</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The lower bound of the range; the <code>max</code>
+        attribute specifies the upper bound. The
+        <code>value</code> attribute specifies the value to have
+        the gauge indicate as the &#8220;measured&#8221; value.</dd>
           
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.low" title="meter.attrs.low" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.low">low</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the
+   <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The
+   <code>optimum</code> attribute
+ gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.high" title="meter.attrs.high" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.high">high</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The <code>optimum</code> attribute gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.max" title="meter.attrs.max" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.max">max</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>Specifies the upper bound.</dd>
           
             <dt><a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.optimum" title="meter.attrs.optimum" href="meter.html#meter.attrs.optimum">optimum</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="datatypes.html#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The <code>optimum</code> attribute gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
         </dl></div>
       

Index: spec.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/markup/spec.html,v
retrieving revision 1.64
retrieving revision 1.65
diff -u -d -r1.64 -r1.65
--- spec.html	29 Jul 2009 07:19:24 -0000	1.64
+++ spec.html	29 Jul 2009 07:42:42 -0000	1.65
@@ -10738,7 +10738,11 @@
       <h2 class="element-head">
 <span class="element">meter</span> &#8211; <span class="shortdesc">scalar gauge</span> <a class="hash" href="#meter">#</a> <a class="toc-bak" href="#meter-toc">T</a>
 </h2>
-      <div id="meter-longdesc" class="longdesc"><p><i class="TK">(element description to come)</i></p></div>
+      <div id="meter-longdesc" class="longdesc">
+    <p>The <a href="#meter" class="element">meter</a> element
+    represents a scalar gauge providing a measurement within a
+    known range, or a fractional value.</p>
+  </div>
       <div class="no-number no-toc" id="meter-content">
         <h2 class="element-subhead">Content model <a class="hash" href="#meter-content">#</a>
 </h2>
@@ -10771,37 +10775,71 @@
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.value" title="meter.attrs.value" href="#meter.attrs.value">value</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>Specifies the value to have the gauge indicate as the
+        &#8220;measured&#8221; value.</dd>
           
             <dt>
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.min" title="meter.attrs.min" href="#meter.attrs.min">min</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The lower bound of the range; the <code>max</code>
+        attribute specifies the upper bound. The
+        <code>value</code> attribute specifies the value to have
+        the gauge indicate as the &#8220;measured&#8221; value.</dd>
           
             <dt>
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.low" title="meter.attrs.low" href="#meter.attrs.low">low</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the
+   <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The
+   <code>optimum</code> attribute
+ gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
             <dt>
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.high" title="meter.attrs.high" href="#meter.attrs.high">high</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The <code>optimum</code> attribute gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
             <dt>
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.max" title="meter.attrs.max" href="#meter.attrs.max">max</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>Specifies the upper bound.</dd>
           
             <dt>
 <a class="attribute-name" id="meter.attrs.optimum" title="meter.attrs.optimum" href="#meter.attrs.optimum">optimum</a><span class="attr-values"> = 
       <a class="ref" href="#common.data.float" title="common.data.float">float</a>
     </span> </dt>
-            <dd><i class="TK">(detailed attribute description to come)</i></dd>
+            <dd>The other three attributes can be used to segment the gauge's range into
+   "low", "medium", and "high" parts, and to indicate which part of the gauge
+   is the "optimum" part. The <code>low</code> attribute specifies the range
+   that is considered to be the "low" part, and the <code>high</code> attribute specifies the
+   range that is considered to be the "high" part. The <code>optimum</code> attribute gives the
+   position that is "optimum"; if that is higher than the "high" value then
+   this indicates that the higher the value, the better; if it's lower than
+   the "low" mark then it indicates that lower values are better, and
+   naturally if it is in between then it indicates that neither high nor low
+   values are good.</dd>
           
         </dl>
 </div>
Received on Wednesday, 29 July 2009 07:42:53 GMT

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