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Re: Longdesc change proposal update

From: Silvia Pfeiffer <silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 8 May 2011 19:18:06 +1000
Message-ID: <BANLkTi=Wqt53qVhdZMUNK4y9Oh1vwx2oEw@mail.gmail.com>
To: Laura Carlson <laura.lee.carlson@gmail.com>
Cc: HTML Accessibility Task Force <public-html-a11y@w3.org>
On Sun, May 8, 2011 at 6:23 PM, Laura Carlson
<laura.lee.carlson@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Silvia,
>
> Thank you very much for checking the change proposal.
>
>> some of your references to e.g. the Glossary on the broken out pages
>> don't work any more. You should go through and check for dangling
>> pointers. ;-)
>
> Will do. Thanks.
>
>> Incidentally, it was enough for me to see the examples that you list
>> on your use cases page
>> http://www.d.umn.edu/~lcarlson/research/ld.html#uc (following to some
>> of the example links) to go: and why aren't browsers providing a
>> right-click context menu item for images with longdesc?
>
> That's what is needed.
>
>> Sometimes I as
>> a sighted user am also keen to understand what e.g. a logo means and
>> what went through a designer's head when they created it. I totally
>> don't see it as a11y use one.
>
> Some sighted people may be aided by access to a longdesc. Browser
> vendors should provide access to those who want or need access.
>
>> I would only recommend that the page
>> that the longdesc points to includes the image itself and a pointer
>> back to the page(s) that it lives on, so as to make it a proper part
>> of the web surfing experience.
>
> It might help. Authors can do that. Not many do.

I'm saying that since it could be a good recommendation to add. Then
it's almost like the pages that Wikipedia has for their uploaded
images, which basically only have the picture and the description that
the upload user has provided, e.g.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Curitiba_10_2006_05_RIT.jpg. It
would make such pages much more useful if they had a proper long
description.

> I don't have a  sample on the User Agents and longdesc Discoverability
> page [1], but in some implementations (an on-page description revealed
> below or alongside an on-page image) it could be redundant.

When it's redundant, it doesn't need it on a linked page of course.
But the @longdesc document is probably a good place for all
information about the picture that we don't want on the page that the
picture is included in.

> Thanks for your thoughtful comments, Silvia.

Trying to think a bit out of the box maybe.

Cheers,
Silvia.


> Best Regards,
> Laura
>
> [1] http://www.d.umn.edu/~lcarlson/research/ld-ua.html
Received on Sunday, 8 May 2011 09:18:55 GMT

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