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Re: Please vote on the canvas accessibility proposal

From: Steven Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 13:27:53 +0000
Message-ID: <55687cf81002250527l6766840bq1371e8212f00dee8@mail.gmail.com>
To: Bruce Lawson <brucel@opera.com>
Cc: Silvia Pfeiffer <silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com>, Ian Hickson <ian@hixie.ch>, public-canvas-api@w3.org, "public-html-a11y@w3.org" <public-html-a11y@w3.org>
hi bruce,


>I think Silvia is exactly right here. We know, for example, that the alt
attribute on images (and accesskey to facilitate keyboard access) haven't
let to a >renaiassance of accessible web sites. It's about education.
(Although I do support imagemap additions to canvas)

Unfortunately nor has education "led to renaiassance of accessible web
sites", it needs to be a combination of edcuation and native methods that
developers do not have to think much about where ever possible.

If accessibility is an addition to what developers do to provide the
content/functionality then quite often they are not going to bother or get
it wrong. That is why i like the imagemap additon to canvas as it may be an
attractive proposition to developers to use in adding interaction to canvas
without them having to add anything for keyboard support at least, and the
labelling of the interactive areas can be done using a native
html mechanisms alt and title attributes for which  there  is already a
large amount of information available.
 But while imagemap provides a good tool for having a fighting chance with
providing accessible content, it does not provide all the answers to the use
cases.

regards
stevef


On 25 February 2010 12:50, Bruce Lawson <brucel@opera.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 25 Feb 2010 13:38:13 +0100, Silvia Pfeiffer <
> silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> I actually am starting to regard this as an educational problem. We
>> need to create a truckload of examples of different types of <canvas>
>> use where the canvas has been made accessible. Web developers use such
>> examples as templates for their own code. Honestly, that will do more
>> to make more <canvas> elements accessible than the introduction of an
>> element that lets them get away with a get-out-of-jail-free card.
>>
>
> I've been trying to keep up with the emails about this while travelling as,
> imo, this is the hardest html5 accessibility problem to solve.
>
> I think Silvia is exactly right here. We know, for example, that the alt
> attribute on images (and accesskey to facilitate keyboard access) haven't
> let to a renaiassance of accessible web sites. It's about education.
> (Although I do support imagemap additions to canvas)
>
> bruce
>
>
> Hang loose and stay groovy,
>
> Bruce Lawson
> Web Evangelist
> www.opera.com (work)
> www.brucelawson.co.uk (personal)
> www.twitter.com/brucel
>



-- 
with regards

Steve Faulkner
Technical Director - TPG Europe
Director - Web Accessibility Tools Consortium

www.paciellogroup.com | www.wat-c.org
Web Accessibility Toolbar -
http://www.paciellogroup.com/resources/wat-ie-about.html
Received on Thursday, 25 February 2010 13:28:50 GMT

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