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Re: GIS Data

From: Gannon Dick <gannon_dick@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2011 12:00:10 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <1316199610.43560.YahooMailClassic@web112613.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
To: Andrew Boyd <facibus@gmail.com>, Bernadette Hyland <bhyland@3roundstones.com>
Cc: Chris Beer <chris@codex.net.au>, public-egov-ig@w3.org, briangryth@gmail.com
Hi All,

I also liked Andrew's observations about user segmentation.  Moreover, Government Services are delivered as if to a machine user (a robot), not a community of human users.  For example US Weather Forecasts are at 12 hour intervals, starting 6:00AM and 6:00PM, roughly, Today and Tonight[1]. This schedule is related to the work day (in the US a couple of hours before work and a couple hours after work).  But that relation is not valid worldwide, and depends a great deal on Latitude.

I'm not suggesting that Weather Forecasting be changed in any way, but I do think we need to develop some sort of standards for "prime time" since there is a growing distinction between channels (gadgets and Social Networks) available during worker (production) hours, and worker leisure (consumption) hours.

--Gannon

[1] http://www.rustprivacy.org/2011/phase/dol/ft-worth.jpg
The orange dashed lines are Civil Twilight, sunrise and sunset.

--- On Tue, 9/13/11, Bernadette Hyland <bhyland@3roundstones.com> wrote:

> From: Bernadette Hyland <bhyland@3roundstones.com>
> Subject: Re: GIS Data
> To: "Andrew Boyd" <facibus@gmail.com>
> Cc: "Chris Beer" <chris@codex.net.au>, public-egov-ig@w3.org, briangryth@gmail.com
> Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2011, 7:47 AM
> Hi Andrew,
> You made some interesting observations about Open Data
> "user segmentation" for lack of a better word.  In my
> experience working with US civil government (federal)
> agencies is that there was an initial rush to publish raw
> data, mostly as proprietary GIS formats, CSV, PDFs, and
> occasionally (poorly) converted to RDF with few links. 
> I agree that it was pretty much useless to the general
> public & frankly to anyone else who didn't have tech
> resources to manipulate it.
> 
> Until recently has been a void in tools to consume the data
> short of slurping into a spreadsheet.   A
> very small number of vendors in the US are providing tools
> to view data in more usable ways and query it (via SPARQL
> 1.1).  That coupled with more awareness of modeling
> Open Government data as 5 star Linked Data will IMO, yield
> the good news the sem tech community has been preaching for
> the last couple years.
> 
> What are others finding in AU & elsewhere?
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Bernadette Hyland
> co-chair W3C Government Linked Data Working Group
> Charter: http://www.w3.org/2011/gld/
> 
> On Sep 12, 2011, at 7:26 PM, Andrew Boyd wrote:
> 
> > On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 6:18 AM, Chris Beer <chris@codex.net.au>
> wrote:
> >> Hi Brian
> >> All Federal level Govt GIS which is publically
> released in Australia is done
> >> so under Creative Commons (CC-by) and is treated
> as Open PSI. In the same
> >> vein I suspect you may find there are US
> jurisdictions which may have moved
> >> to CC and just bundle datasets inc GIS into the
> PSI CC licensed space.
> >> Certain jusrisdictions in Australia (Brisbane City
> Council for instance)
> >> release thier GIS under CC-0 - that is Public
> Domain, no restrictions at
> >> all.
> >> GIS Web Services often are an overlooked area here
> - its not seen as
> >> released or published in the classic sense, and
> service usage rights are
> >> often very liberal.
> >> A US example of GIS btw is PASDA in Penn. http://www.pasda.psu.edu/about/
> >> Cheers
> >> C.
> > 
> > Chris,
> > 
> > interesting point - there is release of data, then
> there is release of
> > data in a consumable form. I recently completed some
> work with an AU
> > government organisation that has a lot to do with
> providing GIS data
> > to industry and interested citizens. Consumers of the
> data fell into
> > three fairly distinct types:
> > - large organisations that just wanted the data that
> they wanted, and
> > as much of it as they could get - based on the
> understanding that they
> > had the resources necessary to manipulate the data in
> whichever way
> > necessary
> > - smaller organisations that wanted value-adds
> wherever possible to
> > minimise the required legwork needed prior to
> consuming the data
> > - others (including private citizens) who did not
> really want data,
> > but the answers that the data could provide them, and
> for whom the raw
> > data was pretty much useless.
> > 
> > The organisation may be looking toward a future where
> they have a
> > smart catalog for those in the first category, a
> referral system for
> > assistance for those in the second category, and a
> lower barrier to
> > entry geoportal for those in the third category.
> > 
> > If I get back there to assist with follow-on work I
> will happily
> > assist with the case study.
> > 
> > Best regards, Andrew
> > 
> > -- 
> > ---
> > Andrew Boyd
> > http://uxbookclub.org -- connect, read, discuss
> > 
> 
> 
> 
Received on Friday, 16 September 2011 19:00:48 GMT

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