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Re: Radio

From: Annette Greiner <amgreiner@lbl.gov>
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2015 13:49:14 -0700
Cc: public-dwbp-wg <public-dwbp-wg@w3.org>
Message-Id: <11245F2D-3AEE-4CDA-B4A9-1D2E5501F694@lbl.gov>
To: Steven Adler <adler1@us.ibm.com>
I do listen to radio on the web, especially baseball games. There is tons of data in a baseball game broadcast. But the fact that radio broadcasts are available online doesn't make me feel that it is within our scope to tell people how to make them.  I look at movies online, too, but I don't think W3C will ever be writing standards for how to make good movies.
-Annette

On Mar 31, 2015, at 12:59 PM, Steven Adler <adler1@us.ibm.com> wrote:

> well sure, but almost every radio station on earth is broadcast on the web.  I regularly listen to Danish and German radio in the car via bluetooth from my smartphone to my car.  
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> Don't you listen to radio on the web?
> 
> Best Regards,
> 
> Steve
> 
> Motto: "Do First, Think, Do it Again"
> 
> <graycol.gif>Annette Greiner ---03/31/2015 12:25:31 PM---This strikes me as important work but way beyond even W3C's scope. I don't see sharing data over the
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> This strikes me as important work but way beyond even W3C's scope. I don't see sharing data over the radio as relevant to publishing data on the web. It's a different medium and will have different needs, worth an entire set of best practices of their own. The recordings could be made available on the web, and it will make sense to apply best practices for data sharing to them, but I don't think our best practices should be driven by this particular use case any more than they are driven by publishing in PDF. It may be the best way to publish in some locales, but it's certainly not the best way to publish for reuse.
> -Annette
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> On Mar 31, 2015, at 7:11 AM, Steven Adler <adler1@us.ibm.com> wrote:
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> > I am working with several governments in Africa on Open Data.  In these countries, internet penetration is at about 10-15%.  Illiteracy is between 45%-70%, depending on the region and country.  The principal tool for communication is radio.  Even in the most remote farm regions, every farm has a radio and more than a billion people tune in to radio shows the way the West did in the 1930's and 40's.  
> > 
> > In these countries, we will use Radio as the communication tool for informing the public about Open Data and I want to make sure we include this communication medium as a "file type" in which metadata must also be communicated.  This requirement is bi-directional.  
> > 
> > Outbound, it is necessary to build best practices in how metadata, data processing, discovery, and retention rules are communicated over radio to the public.  In many of these nations (and in many of our own as well) distrust of government is universal and Open Data from government will be distrusted by default.  Metadata will be key to conversations about the Data that helps build public trust in the information.
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> > Inbound, many Open Data portals will publish MP3 files containing the radio broadcasts and podcasts about the Open Data and our Best Practices must also apply to these file types.
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> > I hope to add television broadcasts in the future, but radio is probably enough for v1 of our recommendations.  
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> > Please let me know what you think.
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> > Best Regards,
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> > Steve
> > 
> > Motto: "Do First, Think, Do it Again"
> > 
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Received on Tuesday, 31 March 2015 20:49:53 UTC

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