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Easy Reading Summary & Abstract of Cognitive Accessibility Roadmap and Gap Analysis

From: McSorley, Jan <jan.mcsorley@pearson.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2018 21:30:56 -0500
Message-ID: <CAFuJ5sOP76LCkCmazKdS=rmVA=7=X_DNOJAiC1hFX8MC5WGDiw@mail.gmail.com>
To: public-cognitive-a11y-tf <public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org>
Hi Everyone,

I was asked to take a look at John Rochford's Easy Reading Summary
<https://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-cognitive-a11y-tf/2018Aug/0013.html>
and provide some suggested edits, but in light of the Front Matter
discussion thread, I wanted to give a +1 to Alastair's rewrite, listed
below.

Prior to seeing Alastair's rewrite of the easy reading summary, I had taken
a stab at editing the abstract itself, maintaining the narrative style.  I
did this as an exercise prior to working on an easy reading summary.  Here
are my edits of the abstract:

> This Cognitive Accessibility Roadmap and Gap Analysis is part of a set of
> informative publications from the Cognitive and Learning Disabilities
> Accessibility Task Force <http://www.w3.org/WAI/PF/cognitive-a11y-tf/>
> (COGA TF).  COGA is a joint task force of the Accessible Platform
> Architectures Working Group <http://www.w3.org/WAI/APA/> (APA WG) and the Accessibility
> Guidelines Working Group <http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/> (AG WG) of the Web
> Accessibility Initiative <http://www.w3.org/WAI/>.
>
> People with cognitive disabilities may experience problems with
> understanding and using the World Wide Web, also called the, “Web.” There
> are many types of cognitive disabilities and many ways to support the needs
> of people who have these disabilities.  The COGA TF created two sets of
> resources to explain what cognitive disabilities are and how they impact
> users of Web content.  These resources are the Cognitive Accessibility
> User Research <https://www.w3.org/TR/coga-user-research/> [
> coga-user-research
> <https://www.w3.org/TR/coga-gap-analysis/#bib-coga-user-research>] and
> the Cognitive Accessibility Issue Papers
> <https://w3c.github.io/coga/issue-papers/> [coga-issue-papers
> <https://www.w3.org/TR/coga-gap-analysis/#bib-coga-issue-papers>].
>
>
>
> The Cognitive Accessibility Roadmap and Gap Analysis builds on these two
> resources to define where gaps may exist in accessibility guidelines for
> people with cognitive disabilities.  These gaps can lead to unmet user
> needs, so this document suggests ways those needs may be met with current
> technology and in the future.  It offers advice on how to make content
> usable for people with learning and cognitive disabilities
> <https://www.w3.org/TR/coga-gap-analysis/#a-appendix-making-content-usable-for-people-with-cognitive-and-learning-disabilities>
> and summarizes helpful techniques to address access issues related to
> cognitive disabilities.
>

Alastair's Rewrite of the Easy Reading Summary:
-------------------
This document focuses on the state of accessibility for people with
learning and cognitive disabilities when using the Web. It builds on the
Cognitive Accessibility User Research [coga-user-research] and Cognitive
Accessibility Issue Papers [coga-issue-papers].

This document provides:
*        a summary of issues and techniques,
*        unmet user needs,
*        suggested ways technologies may meet these needs in the future.

This document is produced by the Cognitive and Learning Disabilities
Accessibility Task Force (COGA TF), a joint task force of the Accessible
Platform Architectures Working Group (APA WG) and the Accessibility
Guidelines Working Group (AG WG) of the Web Accessibility Initiative.

For more general advice on supporting people with learning and cognitive
disabilities see "Making content usable for people with cognitive and
learning disabilities" [coga-usable].
-------------------

I think there are some good suggestions here.  We could probably iterate on
this a couple more times to come up with a final, agreeable solution for
the easy reading summary, but I think that Alastair's suggestions
effectively address some of the concerns that he raised about not changing
the meaning or intent of the original abstract.

Thanks,


Jan McSorley
VP, Accessibility
Psychometrics and Testing Services

400 Center Ridge Drive, Suite E
Austin, TX  78753
M - (512) 673-9569
Twitter: @Jan_McSorley
Skype:  jan.mcsorley
www.linkedin.com/in/janmcsorley

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*We put a man on the moon in the 1960's ... surely we can make information
technology fully accessible to people with disabilities.  It can be done
... it must be done ... it will be done!*
Received on Thursday, 13 September 2018 02:32:05 UTC

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