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RE: RE-VERSION discussion at Munich....

From: Henrik Frystyk Nielsen <frystyk@w3.org>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 1997 18:52:24 -0500
Message-Id: <3.0.3.32.19971117185224.00c29870@localhost>
To: Jim Gettys <jg@pa.dec.com>, http-wg%cuckoo.hpl.hp.com@hplb.hpl.hp.com
At 15:03 11/17/97 -0800, Jim Gettys wrote:

>New text:
>
>Due to interoperability problems with HTTP/1.0 proxies discovered since 
>the publication of RFC 2068, caching proxies MUST, gateways MAY, and tunnels 
>MUST NOT upgrade the request to the highest version they support. The proxy 
>or gateway's response to a request MUST be in the same major version as 
>the request. 

We can't say that if the server that the proxy speaks to is buggy and
doesn't understand HTTP/1.1. It may have to speak HTTP/1.0 in some
situations. It also doesn't make sense to say that gateways MAY upgrade as
they are gateways into other protocols.

I can't see what we get out of this that is not already captured in RFC
2145, section 2.3:

   An HTTP client SHOULD send a request version equal to the highest
   version for which the client is at least conditionally compliant, and
   whose major version is no higher than the highest version supported
   by the server, if this is known.  An HTTP client MUST NOT send a
   version for which it is not at least conditionally compliant.

   An HTTP client MAY send a lower request version, if it is known that
   the server incorrectly implements the HTTP specification, but only
   after the client has determined that the server is actually buggy.

   An HTTP server SHOULD send a response version equal to the highest
   version for which the server is at least conditionally compliant, and
   whose major version is less than or equal to the one received in the
   request.  An HTTP server MUST NOT send a version for which it is not
   at least conditionally compliant.  A server MAY send a 505 (HTTP
   Version Not Supported) response if cannot send a response using the
   major version used in the client's request.

   An HTTP server MAY send a lower response version, if it is known or
   suspected that the client incorrectly implements the HTTP
   specification, but this should not be the default, and this SHOULD
   NOT be done if the request version is HTTP/1.1 or greater.

But then again, I wasn't in Munich, so I may be mising something...

Henrik
--
Henrik Frystyk Nielsen,
World Wide Web Consortium
http://www.w3.org/People/Frystyk
Received on Monday, 17 November 1997 16:01:07 EST

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