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Re: [XML11TF] (on the "restrictive" option)

From: Herve Ruellan <herve.ruellan@crf.canon.fr>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 10:11:01 +0100
Message-ID: <40581625.7020806@crf.canon.fr>
To: Mark Nottingham <mark.nottingham@bea.com>
Cc: Yves Lafon <ylafon@w3.org>, Noah Mendelsohn <noah_mendelsohn@us.ibm.com>, "'XMLP Dist App'" <xml-dist-app@w3.org>

Mark,

I think that this issue is somewhat linked to the main one from Yves' email.

Yves's email was about how to restrict what is allowed in the SOAP 
infoset to ensure the best possible interoperability between SOAP nodes. 
The main point of his proposal is to restrict the content of a SOAP 
infoset to what is serializable with XML 1.0. However, he notes that due 
to the different character encoding allowed in XML 1.0, this might not 
be sufficient to ensure full interoperability between two SOAP nodes.

The character encoding problem can be solved using some content 
negociation mechanism, but I think that the objective of the 
"restrictive" option is to design the constraints that will ensure that 
any SOAP message will be accepted by any SOAP node (assuming the HTTP 
binding is used).

Hope this helps,

Hervé.

Mark Nottingham wrote:

> I think that's a separate issue; it's on the receiving side. The problem 
> here is on the sending side; you might have a message that's perfectly 
> legal, but can't be sent by a binding, because it doesn't support some 
> of the characters in it.
> 
> On Mar 15, 2004, at 9:04 AM, Yves Lafon wrote:
> 
>> Also, if you have a XML 1.0 happy infoset and a serialization in
>> iso-8859-1 with some non ascii characters in it, how will react a 
>> node, as
>> only UTF-8 and UTF-16 encoding are required to be supported?
>>
>> Restricting to XML 1.0 at the infoset level may not be enough.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Mark Nottingham   Principal Technologist
> Office of the CTO   BEA Systems
> 
Received on Wednesday, 17 March 2004 04:11:40 GMT

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