W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > xml-dist-app@w3.org > September 2000

Re: Removal (Time for XMail?)

From: Aaron Swartz <aswartz@swartzfam.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 16:35:13 -0500
To: Bill la Forge <b.laforge@jxml.com>
CC: XML-DIST-APP <xml-dist-app@w3.org>
Message-ID: <B5FA7540.19ED3%aswartz@swartzfam.com>
Bill la Forge <b.laforge@jxml.com> wrote:

>> Not to mention the ability for the sender to update messages after they've
>> been sent. How many times have you wanted "unsend" a message? Can't with
>> SMTP, but if we just emailed URLs back and forth, you could update the
>> content at the URL before the person you sent it to has downloaded it. This
>> is, of course, both a benefit and a drawback.
> This also solves the problem folk have with email attachments. Too many folk
> continually resend document updates as attachments. This provides an automatic
> system--like a web page, but with a PUSH.

Yes, this is also related to the Eudora Sharing Protocol (ESP), which uses
SMTP and attachments to keep documents in sync, for those who don't run
servers.

http://db.tidbits.com/getbits.acgi?tbart=06112

Updates to documents could be sent out as normal messages, but point to the
same URL, basically informing the email client that there's new data there
that should be downloaded. This would also allow people to subscribe to web
pages and news feeds (like RSS) and have them download for off-line viewing.
But they'd always receive the latest version and would be instantly notified
when something was updated.

-- 
        Aaron Swartz         |"This information is top security.
<http://swartzfam.com/aaron/>|     When you have read it, destroy yourself."
  <http://www.theinfo.org/>  |             - Marshall McLuhan            
Received on Friday, 29 September 2000 17:36:18 GMT

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