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WSDL 2.0 spec typos

From: Lawrence Mandel <lmandel@ca.ibm.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Nov 2005 17:54:02 -0500
To: www-ws-desc@w3.org
Message-ID: <OF100123BA.5E7EF8F7-ON852570BB.00760561-852570BB.007DCBCF@ca.ibm.com>
The following entries in the WSDL 2.0 spec contain typos:

Section 2.4.1.1
"A message exchange pattern is uniquely identified by an absolute IRI 
which is used as the value of the {message exchange pattern} property the 
Interface Operation component, and it specifies the fault propagation 
ruleset that its faults obey."
Should say "...property of the Interface..."

Section 2.5.1
"A Interface Message Reference component associates a defined element with 
a message exchanged in an operation. By default, the element is defined in 
the XML Infoset [XML Information Set]."
Should say "An Interface Message Reference..."

Section 2.8.1
"This xs:anyURI MUST an absolute IRI as defined by [IETF RFC 3987]."
Should say "...MUST be an absolute..."

In addition, section 2.3.1, contains two almost identical paragraphs 
(shown below). Is this intentional?

"The Interface component describes faults that have application level 
semantics, i.e. that the client or service is expected to handle, and 
potentially recover from, as part of the application processing logic. For 
example, an Interface component that accepts a credit card number may 
describe faults that indicate the credit card number is invalid, has been 
reported stolen, or has expired. The Interface component does NOT describe 
general system faults such as network failures, out of memory conditions, 
out of disk space conditions, invalid message formats, etc., although 
these faults can be generated as part of the message exchange. Such 
general system faults can reasonably be expected to occur in any message 
exchange and explicitly describing them in an Interface component is 
therefore redundant.
Note that faults other than the ones described in the Interface component 
can also be generated at run-time, i.e. faults are an open set. The 
Interface component describes faults that have application level 
semantics, i.e. that the client or service is expected to handle, and 
potentially recover from, as part of the application processing logic. For 
example, an Interface component that accepts a credit card number may 
describe faults that indicate the credit card number is invalid, has been 
reported stolen, or has expired. The Interface component does not describe 
general system faults such as network failures, out of memory conditions, 
out of disk space conditions, invalid message formats, etc., although 
these faults may be generated as part of the message exchange. Such 
general system faults can reasonably be expected to occur in any message 
exchange and explicitly describing them in an Interface component is 
therefore uninformative."


Lawrence Mandel

Software Developer
IBM Rational Software
Phone: 905 - 413 - 3814   Fax: 905 - 413 - 4920
lmandel@ca.ibm.com
Received on Wednesday, 16 November 2005 22:54:12 GMT

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