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RE: Visibility (was Re: Introducing the Service Oriented Architec tural style, and it's constraints and properties.

From: Champion, Mike <Mike.Champion@SoftwareAG-USA.com>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2003 06:17:26 -0700
Message-ID: <9A4FC925410C024792B85198DF1E97E4051740E6@usmsg03.sagus.com>
To: www-ws-arch@w3.org



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mark Baker [mailto:distobj@acm.org]
> Sent: Friday, February 28, 2003 2:09 AM
> To: David Orchard
> Cc: www-ws-arch@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Visibility (was Re: Introducing the Service Oriented
> Architec tural style, and it's constraints and properties.
> 
> I'm not saying that other properties weren't improved upon - perhaps
> they were, in spades, I don't know.  I'm just asking about visibility;
> is there less visibility with the SOA style than with the REST style?
> 
> You're not going to answer that, are you? 8-/

I think he's answered it -- there's less visibility in an SOA style in an
HTTP environment, or at least it's more expensive to achieve visibility, but
more visibility in XML/SOAP-based SOAs in a multi-protocol environment.
What becomes of the original port numbers, IP addreses, HTTP headers, and
HTTP methods when the message  that came in via HTTP gets relayed over MQ,
BEEP, a JMS implementation, or whatever?  SOAP headers and XML content
standards offer a place to find information on the source, destination,
operation requested, etc. (although this works in both an SOA and a
document-oriented architecture) that standardized intermediaries such as
SOAP routers, SOAP firewalls, etc. can examine.   

You're not going to admit that, are you :-)
Received on Friday, 28 February 2003 08:18:07 GMT

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