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Re: content search

From: Jim Davis <jrd3@alum.mit.edu>
Date: Thu, 02 May 2002 09:11:05 -0700
Message-Id: <5.1.0.14.2.20020502090219.033baad0@127.0.0.1>
To: "Kazeroni, Ladan" <Ladan.Kazeroni@softwareag.com> (by way of "Ralph R. Swick" <swick@w3.org>), www-webdav-dasl@w3.org
At 06:31 AM 5/2/02 -0400, Kazeroni, Ladan wrote:
>Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 03:47:48 -0400 (EDT)
>Message-ID: <DFF2AC9E3583D511A21F0008C7E62106022C366D@daemsg02.software-ag.de>
>From: "Kazeroni, Ladan" <Ladan.Kazeroni@softwareag.com>
>To: "'www-webdav-dasl@w3.org'" <www-webdav-dasl@w3.org>
>
>Hello
>
>Why the content search need to perform property search too (from DTD)?
>
>regards- Ladan

I am not sure I understand your question.

If you mean "Why is content search different from other property searches?" 
it is because content search is more difficult to implement.  An ordinary 
property search can use a table.  There is one row for each document, and 
one column for each property.  It is easy and fast to test each document to 
decide whether it has the property.  But for content search, you must look 
at every word in the document.

You would use a property search, for example, to find a document where you 
know the date and the name of the author.  You would use a content search 
where you know some words that are in the document.

Every database can do property searches, but not every database can do 
content search.  That is why content search is optional in DASL.

I hope this helps.  If it does not help, please ask your question again.
Received on Thursday, 2 May 2002 12:09:08 GMT

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