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RE: Comments for WD-speech-grammar-20010103

From: Andrew Hunt <andrew.hunt@speechworks.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Mar 2002 14:29:30 -0500
To: "Susan Lesch" <lesch@w3.org>
Cc: "W3C Voice List" <www-voice@w3.org>
Message-ID: <NEBBIPBPMMJJJOKAKJHNIEEBEGAA.andrew.hunt@speechworks.com>
Susan,

The changes you submitted in Jan'01 have now been applied to SRGS.
Thank you again for the detailed review.  I apologize that the comments 
slipped through the procedural cracks and took so long to address.

  http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-voice/2001JanMar/0005.html

Please let us know within 2 weeks whether your comments were
satisfactorily addressed.  I will publish a W3C-member-only update 
with these final changes within a week.  Let me know if you want to 
review that document before responding and I will forward a pointer.

Responses inserted below...

--Andrew Hunt
  Co-editor SRGS
  SpeechWorks

> Message-Id: <p05010402b689ac4203c0@[204.210.33.45]>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 23:49:47 -0800
> To: www-voice@w3.org
> From: Susan Lesch <lesch@w3.org>
> Subject: Comments for WD-speech-grammar-20010103
> 
> Here are comments in response to your request for review of the
> "Speech Recognition Grammar Specification for the W3C Speech Interface
> Framework" Last Call Working Draft [1].
> 
> The title "Speech Recognition Grammar Specification for the W3C Speech
> Interface Framework" is pretty long, and there is no other reference to
> the W3C Speech Interface Framework in the spec. What about making the
> title "Speech Recognition Grammar Version 1.0" or "Speech Recognition
> Grammar Specification Version 1.0"?

It is changed to "Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0"


> There needs to be a References section, in place of links out of the
> running text to other documents and sites. Perhaps one is in the works?

Done with separate sections for Normative and Informatice refs.


> For example domains, example.com is used in some cases, others not.
> mygrammars.com is used in 2.2.2, 2.2.5, and 4.5, acme.com in 6.6, and
> sayplease.com in A. grammars.com in 2.2.2 is registered, and opened
> numerous unwanted windows when visited on 14 January 2001. W3C recommends
> using example.com, example.org, and example.net; please see RFC 2606
> section 3 at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2606.txt. If you need an
> evocative domain name, you could create a machine name, for example:
> grammars.example.org. Also, in 2.2.2, did you want the first domain in
> ABNF and XML to match?

Fixed.


> "#" is a "number sign" in Unicode. Variously, it is called a "fragment
> separator," "hash separator," and "pound" in this Working Draft. I would
> say "number sign (#)" globally except in the DTMF section where pound
> makes more sense. Please see http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0000.pdf.
> Some other characters are named below.

Changed terminology to reflect RFC2396 by refering to a fragment identifier
preceded by the number sign ('#').


> Especially to help the conformance section, and also to be clear, you
> could make RFC 2119 a normative reference and quote this part:
>        The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL
>        NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED",  "MAY", and
>        "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in
>        RFC 2119.
> Please see RFC 2119 at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2119.txt. If you don't
> wish to use this RFC, then these words probably need definitions.

Included in new Section 1.6 on terminology.


> Below, a section number is followed by a quote and then a suggestion.

All fixed or occurred in sections that have been removed from the spec.


> 1. second to last par.
> Examples
> examples
> 
> Conformance
> conformance
> 
> Future Study
> future study
> 
> 1. last par.
> Standard
> standard
> 
> 1.1 par. 1
> DTMF [spell out the first time]
> Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF)
> 
> 1.1 par. 2
> through-out
> throughout
> 
> 1.1 last list item
> Voice Browser
> voice browser
> 
> 1.2 par. 2 and 2.2.5
> Speech Recognition N-Gram Grammar Specification
> [should be a local anchor to [N-GRAM] in References]
> 
> 1.2 par. 3
> Dialog Markup Language or through a Speech Recognizer API.
> Dialog Markup Language or through a speech recognizer API.
> 
> 1.2 last list, item 2
> may also includes
> may also include
> 
> 2.1 par. 1
> aka, a terminal symbol
> aka a terminal symbol
> 
> 2.1 par. 2
> white-space [twice]
> white space
> 
> 2.2 par. 1
>      Legal rule names must be legal XML IDs as defined in the
>      XML specification as the "Name" production in Section 2.3.
> could read:
>      Rulenames must match "Name" as defined in XML 1.0 section
>      2.3 [XML] and be legal XML IDs.
> 
> 2.2.2
> a "$" symbol
> a dollar sign ($) character
> 
> in a parentheses
> in parentheses
> 
> 2.2.3
> short-hand
> shorthand
> 
> the "$$" symbols
> two dollar sign characters ($$)
> 
> 2.2.5 par. 2
>      A speech recognizer may choose to support the Speech
>      Recognition N-Gram Grammar Specification in addition to
>      the Speech Recognition Grammar Specification defined in
>      this document.
> could read:
>      A speech recognizer may choose to support the Speech
>      Recognition N-Gram Grammar Specification in addition to
>      the speech recognition grammar defined in this document.
> 
> 2.6 ABNF
> curly braces [five times]
> curly brackets
> 
> 2.7 ABNF
> ISO8859-1
> ISO-8859-1
> 
> 2.8 ABNF list item 2
> "[]"
> "[]" square brackets
> 
> 3.1 par. 1
> The core purposes
> The core purpose
> 
> 3.1 ABNF
> semi-colon
> semicolon
> 
> 3.2 par. 3
> Java(TM) Programming Language
> Java(TM) programming language
> [see http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/]
> 
> 4.2 par. 1
> Locale
> locale
> 
> 4.4. par. 2
> without a rulename identifier (applies both to
> without a rulename identifier; (this applies both to
> 
> 4.5 par. 2
> Java Programming Language
> Java programming language
> 
> 5.4 par. 1
> Grammar [three times]
> grammar
> 
> 5.4 Issues
> shoud
> should
> 
> 5.6 par. 1
> Grammar [three times]
> grammar
> 
> 6.1 last list item
>      principles outlined in Sec. 7 of W3C XSLT recommendation,
>      "Creating the result tree"
> could read [not sure here]:
>      principles outlined in section 7 of the W3C XSLT Recommendation
>      [XSLT], "Creating the Result Tree"
> 
> CFG [please spell out]
> 
> Sec. 7.2, "creating text" of the XSLT specifications
> [not sure here]
> section 7.2 of the XSLT specification [XSLT], "Creating Text"
> 
> 6.3 last list item
> Voice Browser
> voice browser
> 
> 6.5 par. 2
> for the Speech Synthesis Markup Language
> [needs a link in References]
> 
> 6.6
> Lexicon Format
> lexicon format
> 
> 6.6 last par.
> a Lexicon specification
> a lexicon specification
> 
> 6.7 par. 1
> post-fix
> postfix
> 
> curly braces
> curly brackets
> 
> Appendix D par. 1
> Normative
> normative
> 
> Appendix D par. 2
> Dual Tone Multiple Frequency
> Dual Tone Multi-Frequency
> [see 
> http://www.oreilly.com/reference/dictionary/terms/D/Dual_Tone_Multi-Frequency.htm]
> 
> Appendix D par. 4
> commonally
> commonly
> 
> Appendix D par. 6
> post-fix
> postfix
> 
> [1] http://www.w3.org/TR/2001/WD-speech-grammar-20010103/
> 
> Best wishes for your project,
> 
> -- 
> Susan Lesch - mailto:lesch@w3.org  tel:+1.858.483.4819
> World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) - http://www.w3.org/
> 
Received on Tuesday, 12 March 2002 14:30:47 GMT

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