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problem

From: ROSHAN <roshan@kobian.lk>
Date: Wed, 15 May 2002 16:03:32 -0400 (EDT)
Message-ID: <000301c1fc18$81378a80$1964a8c0@TEXTCENTRIC.LK>
To: <www-validator@w3.org>
following errors are found..
pls explain me


error (330): out-of-sync UTF-8 character: byte offset 1962 
line 96: error (330): out-of-sync UTF-8 character: byte offset 2462 
line 166: error (330): out-of-sync UTF-8 character: byte offset 4523 







<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "+//ISBN 0-9673008-1-9//DTD OEB 1.0 Document//EN" "http://openebook.org/dtds/oeb-1.0/oebdoc1.dtd">

<html>

<head>
 <title>page13</title>
 <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="my2.css" />
</head>

<body>
 <table>
  <tr>
   <td class="tc_style_topL">
    &#160;fair voting
   </td>
  </tr>

  <tr>
   <td>
    <table>
     <tr>
      <td class="tc_style_lineLR">
       &#160;
      </td>
      <td class="tc_style_line">
       &#160;
      </td>
      <td class="tc_style_lineLR">
      </td>
     </tr>
    </table>
   </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
   <td class="tc_style_bottomL">
    &#160;
   </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
   <td>
    <table>
     <tr>
      <td>
       <table>
        <tr>
         <td>
          <table>
           <tr>
            <td class="tc_style_low_width">
             &#160;
            </td>
            <td class="tc_style_c1r1"><p>place at more than one level, as in case 2
below. The idea of "one person, one vote"
might not be so transparent nor obvious to
implement. Equally sized districts cannot
always be easily realized. The use of direct
proportionality does not always provide a
satisfactory answer. A few illustrations of
more complex election procedures follow.</p>
            </td>
           </tr>
          </table>
         </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
         <td>
          <table>
           <tr>
            <td class="tc_style_high_width1">
             &#160;
            </td>
            <td class="tc_style_c1r2"><p>Stockholders in a corporation, when
voting for its board of directors, are
typically allowed one vote for each
share of stock they own. They may be
allowed to vote for more than one
candidate for the board as well. The
board may then elect officers or
committees who in turn make most
corporate decisions. It will be seen that
is not always true that a stockholder's
voting influence is proportional to the
number of shares he or she possesses.</p>
          </td>
           </tr>
           <tr>
            <td class="tc_style_high_width2">
             &#160;
            </td>
            <td class="tc_style_c1r3"><p>The President of the United States
currently is not elected directly by the
people. The election is a two-tiered
process. The voters in each state (and
the District of Columbia) first cast their
ballots to determine which party's
candidate will carry the state. Each state
plus D.C.) then casts a "weighted</p>

            </td>
           </tr>
          </table>
         </td>
        </tr>
       </table>
      </td>
      <td class="tc_style_mid_width">
       &#160;
      </td>
      <td>
       <table>
        <tr>
         <td class="tc_style_c2r1"><p>vote" in the Electoral College. The
number of votes each state has in the
Electoral College equals the number of
members it has in the U.S. Congress
the number in the U.S. House of
Representatives plus two for the
Senate), whereas the District of
Columbia is assigned three votes. Only
plurality (the most votes) is needed to
win in a state, whereas a majority (more
than half of the votes) is required to be
declared the winner in the Electoral
College. There have been several times
when the U. S. President was elected
by less than a majority of the vote of
the people, and a few times without
even a plurality of the popular vote. If
no one candidate were to obtain a
majority of the Electoral College vote,
then this election process would
become even more complicated.</p>
       </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
         <td class="tc_style_c2r2"><p>The multilevel election rules for being
nominated the presidential candidate
for the Democratic Party or Republican
Party are much more complicated than
the presidential election discussed in</p>
case 2.

         </td>
        </tr>
       </table>
      </td>
      <td class="tc_style_mid_width">
       &#160;
      </td>
      <td>
       <table>
        <tr>
         <td class="tc_style_c3r1"><p>Consider the case of a local government,
such as a county board of supervisors,
which represents the interests of
different municipalities within the
county as well as all of the county's
residents. The objective for the board is
two-fold:</p>

         </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
         <td class="tc_style_c3r2"><p>Each citizen should, in some sense, have
equal influence on the board's
decisions. The principle of "one person,
one vote" must hold in some manner.
Courts would typically outlaw any
procedure that failed to meet this
standard, if anyone were to challenge it.
          </p>
         </td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
         <td class="tc_style_c3r3"><p>Counties are usually composed of some
submunicipalities such as cities, towns,
rural townships, or unincorporated
regions that may have their own local
governments and particular interests.
A traditional objective of county boards
has been to represent the interests of all
these distinct subunits, as well as the
individuals in the county.</p>

         </td>
        </tr>
       </table>
      </td>
      <td class="tc_style_right_width">
       &#160;
      </td>
     </tr>
    </table>
   </td>
  </tr>
 </table>
</body>
</html>
Received on Thursday, 23 May 2002 14:27:18 GMT

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