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[Bug 21577] New: NFC issues reported wrong way: wrong char highlighted, wrong total amount

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 04 Apr 2013 08:27:08 +0000
To: www-validator-cvs@w3.org
Message-ID: <bug-21577-169@http.www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/>
https://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=21577

            Bug ID: 21577
           Summary: NFC issues reported wrong way: wrong char highlighted,
                    wrong total amount
    Classification: Unclassified
           Product: Validator
           Version: HEAD
          Hardware: PC
                OS: Windows NT
            Status: NEW
          Severity: normal
          Priority: P2
         Component: HTML5
          Assignee: mike+validator@w3.org
          Reporter: jukka.k.korpela@kolumbus.fi
        QA Contact: www-validator-cvs@w3.org

When the HTML5 validator issues warnings about deviations from Normalization
Form C (NFC), it highlights the last character of the text run, not the
offending character. It also reports the number of warnings as too large.

These problems are not present in validator.nu: it highlights the entire text
run, and it does not report the number of warnings.

Example:

<!doctype html>
<title>Χαίρε· Hello world</title>

Excerpt from validator output, when using direct input:

QUOTE
Validation Output: 4 Warnings

Below is a list of the warning message(s) produced when checking your document.

    Warning Line 2, Column 25: Text run is not in Unicode Normalization Form C.

    <title>Χαίρε· Hello world</title>
UNQUOTE

Here the letter “d” or “world” appears in red, and the column number 25 refers
to “d”, too. There are no other warnings issued, yet the total number of
warnings is reported as 4. (Perhaps the validator counts informative messages
as warnings, for the purposes of calculating this total? There are 3
informative messages in this case.)

Flagging the last character of a text run is more confusing in real-life
situations where the run is all Greek. In the context where I originally met
this issue, things were confusing since the last character of the run was ά,
Greek alpha with tonos, which *could* have been in non-NFC form (but wasn’t).

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