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RE: What is at the end of the namespace?

From: Dan Brickley <danbri@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 09:10:29 -0500 (EST)
To: <Patrick.Stickler@nokia.com>
cc: <roconnor@Math.Berkeley.EDU>, <www-talk@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.30.0111160909590.15883-100000@tux.w3.org>
On Fri, 16 Nov 2001 Patrick.Stickler@nokia.com wrote:

>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: ext roconnor@Math.Berkeley.EDU
> > [mailto:roconnor@Math.Berkeley.EDU]
> > Sent: 16 November, 2001 03:26
> > To: www-talk@w3.org
> > Subject: Re: What is at the end of the namespace?
> >
> >
> > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> > Hash: SHA1
> >
> > > > Yes, URIs *may* denote abstract resources. No, HTTP URLs
> > may *not*.
> > >
> > > Patrick, as an author of both of those specifications, I can
> > > definitively state that what you are saying does not match
> > what I intended
> > > when I wrote the sections to which you have referred.
> >
> > I must admit that I always thought that HTTP URIs were some retrivable
> > resouce, but after looking at the introduction to  RFC 2068:
> >
> >    Practical information systems require more functionality
> > than simple
> >    retrieval, including search, front-end update, and annotation. HTTP
> >    allows an open-ended set of methods that indicate the purpose of a
> >    request.
> >
> > It seems that Sean is right.  HTTP URIs seem like they could mean
> > anything.
>
> I don't read it that way at all! I think you are reading your
> own interpretation into the language, not judging what it
> actually says.
>
> A 'request' means that something should be provided as a response
> to that 'request'. You can't 'request' an abstract entity. You
> can only reference it.

You can request a representation of an abstract entity.

Dan
Received on Friday, 16 November 2001 09:10:36 GMT

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