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RE: Frames

From: Jay Chalfant <jchalfan@outbackinc.com>
Date: Mon, 1 May 2000 10:39:15 -0700
Message-ID: <9D7F61B87714D31194530090276212441F424C@outback.internal.outbackinc.com>
To: www-talk@w3c.org
There is another feature of frames that is even more important from our
perspective. A web application may use a frameset that keeps one of the
frames loaded throughout the application session. This "constant" frame is
the only place to store persistent Java and JavaScript components. These
components are then used by other frames in the frameset that change as the
user navigates through the application. 

The ability to store complex state on the client in a convenient and
seamless fashion is a cornerstone of our approach to building web
applications. I'd hate to see this go away.

-J

----------------------
Jay Chalfant
OutBack Resource Group
www.outbackinc.com


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Grahame Grieve [mailto:grahame@kestral.com.au]
> Sent: Sunday, April 30, 2000 8:34 PM
> To: www-talk@w3c.org
> Subject: Frames
> 
> 
> Frames aren't part of the official HTML standard.
> A long time ago I remember reading somewhere that they
> were not going to be adopted by w3c (thankfully) and 
> that all the functionality they provided would be 
> provided by CSS instead
> 
> One important piece of functionality frames offer I haven't 
> figured out how to reproduce yet. This is the inclusion
> of a tool bar across the top of the document that doesn't
> scroll off the top of the window when the user scrolls 
> downwards while viewing a long document
> 
> is there anyway to reproduce this behaviour without usng
> frames? (which I will not use under any circumstances)
> 
> Grahame
> 
Received on Monday, 1 May 2000 13:35:00 GMT

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