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Re: PUT method (& all it's siblings)

From: Matthew Denner <matt@wdi.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 1996 07:30:24 +0100
Message-ID: <32195B80.2BAC@wdi.co.uk>
To: www-talk@w3.org
I get the www-talk-digest so bear with me for the moment.  I apologise
for 
the length of this email but I'm doing just one to this list for the
moment.

>
> Subject: PUT method
> From: Jeremey Barrett <jeremey@forequest.com>
>
> Question: Is there something odd about the PUT method that Netscape
>           does not allow it to be used as a method on a form?
> 

PUT is an extension to HTTP/1.0 included in the HTTP/1.1 protocol.  It
should be used to create a new entity on the web-site (i.e. if you edit
a
page with Netscape Navigator Gold and then 'publish' it, it get's PUT
onto
the web-site).  There is, in theory, no reason why it shouldn't be used
however, you must remember that this method is used for creating a new 
entity altogether and as such the form must be doing something pretty
special.

I think you'll find that the browser is converting the PUT method to
something
else as, as I've mentioned before, this is for creating a totally new
entity.

> 
> Subject: Re: PUT method
> From: jna <jna@retina.net>
> 
> What exactly is a PUT method? At last check, there was no such method.
> 
> Perhaps netscape implements it as an alias to 'POST', but to the best
> of my knowledge there are TWO methods: POST and GET.
> 

With relation to HTML forms there is only POST and GET.  Check the
HTTP/1.1
protocol and you will find that there is also a PUT.  It sounds to me
like Jeremy has read the protocol specification and seen PUT, thought it
would work (like I would) for an HTML form, and tried it with no
success.

>
> PUT sounds like a netscape-ism, and probably should be avoided in the
> name of standards. :)
> 

As far as I know the PUT method comes from the HTTP/1.1 protocol (as
I've
been labouring for the last couple of lines ;) and is not related to the
HTML form in any way.  Netscape-ism it may be, but it should be used in
the correct context: HTTP daemons only please.

> 
> Subject: Re: PUT method
> From: Dmitry Beransky <dberansky@ucsd.edu>
> 
> PUT is a method that is defined in HTTP/1.1 [1].  It was not in HTTP/1.0
> [2].  As far as I can tell Netscape doesn't support the 1.1 specs yet,
> although it is definitely aware of them.
> 

Netscape definitely doesn't although if you study the header from the
browser
you'll see that it pretends to.  In the header it states (loud and proud
:)
'Connection: keep-alive' which is an HTTP/1.1 protocol issue.  Does it
do this?
Does it heck :)

Hope this solves some of the problems.

Cheers,
Matt

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Matthew Denner  			email:	matt@wdi.co.uk
Senior Programmer			tel:	(+44)(0) 1305 871 543
Abbotsbury Software Ltd			fax:	(+44)(0) 1305 871 688
ENGLAND					mobile:	(+44)(0) 385  795 492
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Received on Tuesday, 20 August 1996 03:34:15 GMT

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