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Assistance in Posting this book

From: Paul Murray <74534.1273@compuserve.com>
Date: 09 Dec 95 19:19:23 EST
To: SYNSOPS_CERN <www-talk@www0.cern.ch>
Message-Id: <951210001923_74534.1273_EHH129-2@CompuServe.COM>
Here is a book on parapsycology that we wish to publish on the Internet. Our
thesis is that "the more learning disabed a person is, assuming normal or above
intelligence, the more likely they are to have psychic abilities." There is a
self-test for Creative Thinking and 61 stratagies for coping with learning
differences.  This information is useful to everyone.

From: 	Paul Murray at INTERNET:74534,1273@compuserve.com




					CREATIVE
					THINKING:

				YOUR  PERSONAL  CAPACITY TO
				 UNLOCK  GENIUS  ABILITIES

				   AVOID EMBARRASSMENT, 
			      GAIN RESPECT, and BE POPULAR


			What is your level of Creative Thinking?
			    Do you have learning differences?
			      Can you see into the future ?


			   BY:  DANIELE M. and PAUL F. MURRAY


 		(C) Copyright 1995  Daniele M. and Paul F. Murray.  
	     Not to be reprinted or  reproduced in any form without 
                  the express written permission of the authors.





		Copyright by Daniele M. Murray and Paul F. Murray


         All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright
Conventions. Published in the United States by Cyber-Space Publishing,
a division of the Caring for Children Foundation, LTD

			First Printing November 1995

Cyber-Space Publishing  E-Mail address: INTERNET:74534.1273@compuserve.com

This information on learning differences and the abilities of Creative Thinking
that many people have is being provided freely on the Internet so that others
who have similar feelings and capabilities can be successful with less effort
and in a relatively shorter time.

Donations are welcome as a resource to bring this information to many who would
otherwise not be aware of these thoughts.  If you find this information useful,
a donation of $10, or whatever you can afford, will be gratefully accepted.
Thank you.


		      Caring for Children Foundation, LTD.
		      P.O. Box 2009, Osterville, MA 02655



					CONTENTS


TITTLE								       PAGE

PREFACE
4

INTRODUCTION								 6

CREATIVE THINKING						        10

LEARNING DIFFERENCES- A LIFE OF CONFUSION  AND  
EMBARRASSMENT, WITH  GENIUS ABILITIES:					12

STRENGTHS OF CREATIVE THINKERS						15

UNUSUAL ABILITIES OF SOME CREATIVE THINKERS				18

SOME GIFTS OF CREATIVE THINKING
20

USEFUL TEACHING CONCEPTS						23

61  EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR CREATIVE THINKERS			        26

SOCIAL SKILLS								26

TECHNICAL SKILLS							37

CONCLUSIONS								50

APPENDIX  A: REFERENCES:  BOOKS and SEMINARS				53

APPENDIX  B: STUDENT'S SELF-TEST'S  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING	        60    

APPENDIX  C: ADULT'S  SELF-TEST'S  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING	        64

APPENDIX  D: SOME COMMON TRAITS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LEARNING 
DIFFERENCES OF DYSLEXIA AND ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER	                68

APPENDIX  E: SOME PSYCHIC EXPERIENCES OF CREATIVE THINKERS              71


				 PREFACE

In addition to the sources referenced in Appendix A, the ideas in this book are
based on the authors' personal experiences with learning differences:
characterized as dyslexia and the related syndrome of attention inconsistency,
thinking visually, and seeking stimulation, that is commonly refereed to as
Attention Deficit Deficiency (ADD).

Paul Murray, spent many years living with the handicaps described above. It took
hard work, persistence, some fortunate luck, and use of many of the techniques
explained here, to reach the highest levels of success in academics, sports, and
business.  The co-author, Daniele Murray, is a  student who is learning to live
with her learning differences and to unlock her unique mental abilities of
Creative Thinking.

This information on learning differences and the abilities of Creative Thinking
that many people have is being provided so that others who have similar feelings
and capabilities can be successful with less effort and in a relatively shorter
time.  

As with all ideas, the "idea" in this book can not be copyrighted.  We want the
ideas to spread.  Modify them, adapt them, tell others, test the questionnaire,
and invent new strategies.  The only thing that's copyrighted is the wording of
this text. Permission is hereby granted for you to reproduce this text, or
excerpts, for public benefit (e.g. in a non-profit newsletters); but not for
commercial uses.  It is our express intention to publish this text commercially.
      
If you do print articles that discuss these views, we would love it if you can
send us a copy.  We would like to follow the ideas and discussions.

		          Caring for Children Foundation, LTD.
			E-Mail INTERNET:74534.1273@compuserve.com;
			   P.O. Box 2009, Osterville, MA 02655; 
			


INTRODUCTION

The theme of this book is that, "Everyone is different; but that each person has
some of both the positive and the negative attributes of learning differences.
There are a multitude of attributes and each person falls some where on a
continuum of ability for each trait.  Everyone has some of the attributes of
Creative Thinking and can benefit from the ideas presented here.

To determine an approximation of your personal degree of Creative Thinking,
please take a few moments now to take one of the "Self-Tests For Creative
Thinking" in Appendix B or C. Appendix B is for students and Appendix C is for
adults.

One of the intentions of this book is  to reach those individuals needing
remedial educational training because of learning differences. Hopefully the
information provided here will motivate them to take control of their future.
We hope to place them in a frame of mind to acknowledge their situation and also
to see "a light at the end of the tunnel."   Once these individuals can overcome
their educational problems and learn to cope with the complexities of learning
differences, they can look forward to the possibility of using some of their
genius abilities of Creative Thinking that are available to them as a result of
their unique thinking processes.

A second objective of this book is to replace the negative sigma, that
unfortunately frequently accompanies learning differences like: dyslexia and
ADD, with the positive attributes of unique mental abilities, that we call
Creative Thinking.  These strengths come from the visual mental processing that
enables many Creative Thinkers to discern patterns into the future, communicate
on a higher level, and understand complexities that baffle others.

The third objective of this book is to help identify those individuals having a
high degree of Creative Thinking.  Only rarely does a person with learning
differences get to make use of his Creative Thinking abilities.  Too many people
fail to reach their potential.  

The future rests in the hands of those who can think creatively and accomplish
what no one can even envision in today's environment.  People with learning
differences frequently have gifts of mental abilities that they and others can
not even comprehend. In yesterday's environment conformity was required; but for
tomorrow's the ability to think creatively, beyond anyone's current imagination,
will be necessary to be competitive.

This book is not intended to provide remedial training of educational
deficiencies, such as: reading, spelling, handwriting, comprehension, etc.  This
educational achievement can only be accomplished in a school or tutoring setting
with patience, structure, considerable time, review of the basics of language,
and a multi-dimensional educational approach using the senses of hearing,
seeing, touching, and feeling.  

This book is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice. The ideas
in this book are based on the authors' personal experiences with learning
differences; and as such these ideas are not to be considered medical advise.
Readers should seek competent medical advice from qualified health care
practitioners for any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical treatment,
and before taking any medication, including over the counter medicine.

There are some interesting and reportedly successful medical and common sense
treatments that seem to be helping many people with learning differences. *
These treatments include stimulants: like Ritlin or caffeine, antihistamine
medicines that treat inner ear problems: like Sudafed or Dimetapp, anti-motion
treatments: like Dramamine or Bonine, and coping skills to deal with confusion
and disorientation.  Following a well-balanced diet, eating breakfast, taking
vitamins and minerals supplements, and getting 30 minutes of vigorous exercise
daily is good common sense that will help everyone. Both authors have been
following the medical advise of Dr. Levinson, regarding inner ear medicine, with
significant success.

*  Please refer to Dr. Harold Levinson's book, Smart But Feeling Dumb, Mr.
Ronald Davis' book, The Gift of Dyslexia, as well as other sources in Appendix
B.


CREATIVE THINKING

Creative Thinkers can frequently see into the future by identifying and
projecting patterns and other forms.  With the use of unique visual mental
processes they are able to predict outcomes and visualize results that others
can not comprehend. Creative Thinkers can also sometimes change time
perspectives and view events as they unfold in slow motion.  This can enables
them to react favorably especially in sports. 

These abilities seem to be most pronounced in people that we frequently consider
to be handicapped or even stupid.  Creative Thinking is the positive side of
those people who have learning differences like dyslexia and Attention Deficit
Disorder.  Some of the common traits associated with learning differences of
dyslexia and ADD are listed for reference in 
Appendix C.

Creative Thinkers unique mental processing style of three-dimensional
visualization, of abstract as well as material things, can create some
interesting and profitable observations.

Creative Thinkers often find it easy to move from one field to another; because
they can master new subjects quickly and become instant experts.  They can see
the big picture, not get lost in details, and get to the heart of the matter.
Creative Thinkers see patterns, connections, and similarities that enable them
to see clearly into the future by projection.


LEARNING DIFFERENCES-  A LIFE OF CONFUSION  AND  EMBARRASSMENT,  
WITH  GENIUS ABILITIES:

Disabilities can be physical or mental. Our society provides special
considerations and compassion for people who are physically disabled, especially
those who are  visually obvious, such as those using a cane or a wheelchair.
Mental disabilities, like the learning differences of dyslexia and ADD, are
hidden. 

The students with specific learning disabilities are  protected by a federal
law, The Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), and various state laws.  The
federal law, IDEA, assures that all children with disabilities are provided a
free, appropriate public education designed to meet their unique needs.

Dyslexia is a learning difference of language and communication that can result
in lapses of memory, difficulties in learning to read and communicate, or the
lack of understanding of social situations. The characteristics of the learning
difference Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), without hyperactivity, include:
being aware of everything around them, easily distracted, seeking stimulation,
having difficulty with auditory processing, and thinking visually.  People with
these learning differences are unique because they learn, think, and respond
differently to the world around them.  They frequently are very Creative
Thinkers because of their unique mental processing.

Those of us who have learning differences do not want to expose the inability to
function sometimes as quickly or with the same memory functions as others,
because of embarrassment.   Frequently others will laugh at simple mistakes,
such as: not knowing the day of the week, a close relative's name, how to
remember and dial a telephone number, or the location of a letter in the
alphabet. These examples may explain why people with learning differences have a
sense of inferiority and tend to withdraw from social contact. The sense of
frustration, ridicule, and embarrassment can be overwhelming. Many times these
handicaps can be overcome by training, medicine, and instruction; but most
difficulties are with us for life.  Those traits that we can not change are
sometimes better not disclosed and can be disguised with some simple deception. 

Using deception is okay for self protection.  Do not give anyone the opportunity
to laugh at you, ridicule, or humiliate you in any way.  Athletes, like Greg
Lemond the former World champion cyclist, use deception to hide their real
feelings of hurting, physically and mentally. Greg told me, "Never let your
competitors see you hurting.  Put on an act to deceive them, otherwise they will
attack you when they think that you are the weakest."  

Arnold Schwarzenegger's  advice, in posing in a body building contest, was,
"Never let the judges see your weaknesses.  Show your strengths  and  hide  any
problems.  Be self-confident about your abilities and they will show."

Dale Carnegie, the famous personal relations and public speaking coach, said,
"Assume a trait like self-confidence and soon you will be use to it and it will
come naturally to you."  Spies need deception to protect their real identity,
their objectives, and frequently their life. Make use of the suggestions that
follow and others that you invent to present yourself in a way that, "you can
anticipate and control situations."


STRENGTHS OF CREATIVE THINKERS

Many people with learning differences are capable of some extraordinary thinking
and can be extremely successful once they learn some coping strategies.  Some of
Creative Thinker's strengths are: 

 Persistence, 
 Concentration, 
 Perception, 
 Vivid imagination, 
 Creativity, 
 Drive and ambition, 
 Curiosity, 
 Thinking in pictures instead of words, 
 Superior reasoning, 
 Capable of seeing things differently from others, 
 Love of complexity,
 Simultaneous multiple thought processing, 
 Quickly mastering new concepts, and 
 Not following the Crowd.

Most people who are not dyslexic and rate low on the scale of Creative Thinking,
are verbal learners, based on word acquisition by hearing.  Verbal learning is
limited to the speed of speaking and this information goes into the conscious
mind, so that the non-dyslexic is aware of the information.  

Thinking and learning in pictures rather than words is thousands of time faster,
and is subliminal, going directly into the subconscious mind.  This visual
learning style is what a Creative Thinker uses.  The acquisition of information
as pictures create an immense amount of multi-dimensional information, that can
be manipulated in many forms by the brain to enable intuitive thinking,
perception, and other interesting thought processes.  Frequently this learning
style leads to thought delays, because of the tremendous amounts of information
processed.

This rapid acquisition of picture form knowledge gives the Creative Thinker a
significant advantage; but confusion and disorientation can arise with words and
thoughts that do not have pictures, like sight words.   Non-visual sight words
must be learned and experienced multi-dimensionally for dyslexics to learn to
read. Fortunately there are only a few hundred simple words to learn.


UNUSUAL ABILITIES OF SOME CREATIVE THINKERS

Although each Creative Thinker is distinctively different in their mental
capabilities, some of these abilities can be evidence of the intellectual and
creative powers of a genius waiting to be unlocked.  Imagine feeling that
someone is behind you before you can see or hear them.  Some Creative Thinkers
have mental abilities that go well beyond this common phenomena and approach the
supernatural.

Examples include: 

 	Doing complex math in their head quickly; but not knowing how they
did it, 
 
 	Seeing a solution from a mental examination of the components, such
as projecting interest 	rates for investments, or creating a new
computer chip,
 
 	Communicating telepathically with others, or 
 
 	Controlling the outcome of events, like calling the correct numbers
on dice before they are rolled.  

Although not all Creative Thinkers possess these talents, extrasensory
perceptions like these represent abilities that are uniquely valuable to some;
but ludicrous to others who do not understand the learning and mental processing
differences of Creative Thinking. 

The authors intend to continue with research about some of the phenomena
described above as super natural gifts.  Readers are invited to provide their
personal experiences. If you have any of these special gifts please tell us
along with your test scores. Appendix D describes a few psychic experiences.

Creative Thinkers have some unique gifts that enable them to succeed in areas of
great difficulty for other people.  In spite of the frustrations of mental
lapses that people with learning differences frequently experience, they do have
a number of mental abilities that are unique and valuable.  Some of the natural
advantages of being a Creative Thinker are described here as challenges to make
use of their distinct talents.

SOME GIFTS OF CREATIVE THINKING: 

.	USE YOUR SUPERIOR REASONING AND CONCENTRATION SKILLS:  

The ability to see things that others fail to recognize, such as: patterns of
activities that lead to predicting future events and understanding of complex
issues can compensate for short term handicaps.   Give thought before answering
or preparing written material.  Look for meaning, especially ones that others
will not see, until you identify them. Use your powers of total concentration;
and share your ability to visualize and see ahead.

.	USE YOUR CREATIVITY, CURIOSITY, AND IMAGINATION:  

Creative Thinkers are naturally very inventive and can use this trait to be
successful.  Be curious.  Do something new.  Break the mold of conformity.
Invent exciting situations. Use your curiosity and imagination to explore and
learn.  Make use of your ability to notice everything happening around you.

.	UTILIZE RAPID MASTERY AND PERCEPTION TALENTS:  

Many Creative Thinkers can learn new concepts and master new subjects quickly
because of their visual learning style and their ability to see problems and
situations from many angles.  Be comfortable making rapid decisions.  Be results
orientated.

.	MAKE  USE  OF  THE  ABILITY  TO PROCESS  MANY THOUGHTS
SIMULTANEOUSLY AND HAVE A HIGH 	TOLERANCE FOR AMBIGUITY:  
	
The ability to watch and comprehend a number of television channels at the same
time, while reading, and listening to music is a unique ability to think and
perceive on multiple levels.  Ambiguity is the ability to be comfortable with
uncertainty.  Seek to have many different activities going on at the same time.

.	BE COMFORTABLE BEING DIFFERENT:  
 
Most people in our society are conformists, who "follow the crowd."  Creative
Thinkers frequently go in a different direction than others because they see the
world around them in a unique visual way.   The ability to see solutions that
are different from the norm can result in exciting employment opportunities, for
example in investments, computer programming, and national security areas.
Creating unique interesting situations can result in personal leadership and
profitable opportunities.

.	CONTROL DRIVE AND AMBITION:  

Try to achieve a degree of reasonableness in the challenges that you undertake.
Many Creative Thinkers are impulsively driven to accomplish more and more
without limits, and can become overachievers. Set reasonable goals in a
stair-like format to create winning situations.   Control your impulse to seek
huge wins and a sometimes exaggerated sense of urgency and impatience.  Build on
success.

USEFUL TEACHING  CONCEPTS

Teachers and others trying to help people with learning disabilities can provide
motivation  and support by:

 	Empowering the student to make a contribution that is within their
ability and is useful,
 
 	Provide choices to enable the student to feel in control,
 
 	Conducting early testing for learning differences to obtain early
intervention and avoid the ridicule and embarrassment that most 	students
with learning differences feel,
 
 	Provide opportunities for the student to teach others about something
that they know,
 
 	Use visual and hands on, tactile, learning experiences and reduce the
use of lectures and books,
 
 	Use computers as private tutors to teach at the student's level for
remedial work,

 	Use line dancing and other group movements like hand signs, to
practice rhythm, balance, and coordination,
 
 	Giving specific praise to make them feel special, and 
 
 	Be that adult that that believes in them and is there for support.
 
 	Establish peer tutors so that students have role models and people
they can speak frankly 	with,
 
	Use touching, hugs, etc, as a warm positive experience that builds
self-esteem and confidence.
 
 	Help students develop a system for systematically solving problems
including: defining the problem, establishment of criteria,
discussing alternatives, and coming to a logical
conclusion.
 
 	Provide time structure for students and break up assignments into
manageable pieces, and
 
 	Use games to teach reasonable risk taking.


		61  EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES  FOR CREATIVE THINKERS:

Students and adults with learning differences, of dyslexia and ADD need some
"personal magic" to deal with other people to avoid embarrassment and gain
respect.  Many Creative Thinkers frequently  feel left out of relationships and
social situations. They suffer from frustration and embarrassment, because they
can not do some of the things that others consider simple.  Creative Thinkers,
and others, should consider the following  strategies of social and technical
skills that represent common sense compensations, are relatively easy to
implement, and are free of charge.

SOCIAL SKILLS:

1.	BE  SELF-CONFIDENT: 

Look,  feel,  and act in control;  knowledgeable and ready to meet any
challenge. Volunteer, raise your hand and try.  You will be successful sometimes
and learn more from failures than any other way.  Meet new people, make small
talk, say hello to strangers, ask questions, participate.

2.	ANTICIPATE  SITUATIONS:  

Be ready to react to problems by using your reasoning skills to think ahead to
possible outcomes and allow your mind to prepare solutions in advance.

3.	LEARN TO DEAL WITH FAILURE: 
 
Everybody experiences failure.  The intelligent people learn, by analyzing the
situation, to try to turn the experience into a profit.  Review tests to
completely understand all questions and redraft all papers returned with
corrections.  Try to learn from each mistake, criticisms, etc. Attack problems
from many angles, so that if one fails, alternatives are ready.  Analyze and ask
others what went wrong in relations, situations, etc.  Learn what you might do
differently.

4.	BE PERSISTENT:  

Never let others influence you to quit.  Do not give up. Go on longer than
anyone expects you to and you will probably see results that will surprise you
because Creative Thinkers have unique abilities. Don't be discouraged by set
backs.  If your answer is not correct, ask why not and try again. Use your
self-confidence to try many times with different approaches each time.

5.	SEEK OUT WAYS TO BE SUCCESSFUL:  

Look in any area for success  such as:  sports, social, school, home, community,
etc.  Look for ways to achieve positive results to keep up your spirits and
motivation. When you think that you know an answer, be sure to volunteer.  Look
for small winning situations.

6.	THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK:  

Consider the possible reaction that other people may have to what you are about
to say.  Avoid impulsive statements that you may later regret, wish to take
back, or want to apologize for.

7.	ASK FOR HELP:
  
Raise questions in  your mind.  Be sure that you understand, and can repeat in
your words, the ideas being covered.   If not, say that you do not understand
and ask for explanations or help.  Ask people to define words that are new to
you. Ask a classmate or other friends to help explain directions, homework,
etc.; so that you understand what and when you have to do something.  Using a
peer as a tutor can help.

8.	AVOID HIGH PROBABILITY FAILURE EXPERIENCES: 
 
Do not set unrealistically high goals.  Examine your probability of success
before committing to play or participate.  Get the odds in your favor.  Set
realistic goals.  Look for small wins.

9.	ASK PEERS HOW THEY DEAL WITH THE PROBLEMS THAT YOU FACE:  

Don't be afraid to show your feelings and discuss your concerns with sympathetic
friends.  Open up to sympathetic associates.   Ask others how they would deal
with problems that you face.

10.	TRY NOT TO BE A LONER:  

Social interaction is necessary and helpful to meet your needs of acceptance, as
a source of information, and personal realizations.  Be involved.  Find a friend
to help you with introductions, introduce yourself, or ask a question of someone
new.

11.	FORCE YOURSELF TO SAY HELLO EVEN THOUGH YOU CAN'T REMEMBER NAMES:  	

Creative Thinkers frequently are shy and avoid social contacts.  They walk
around with blinders on because they are fearful of meeting someone that they
know very well, and realize that the person's  name will not come to them.  It's
very important to say hello and be friendly.  The name will usually come to you.
If the name does not come to you, ask "Excuse me, I have a poor memory, I forgot
your name."  Keep your head up and say hello. Do not duck people just because
you may not know their name.  Use the third person, you, in conversation.  Being
friendly is more important than remembering a name.  Your real friends will most
likely know about your memory difficulties and have compassion.

12.	LEARN HOW TO MAKE SMALL TALK:  

Small talk is the sometimes meaningless or simple discussions that we have with
friends or new acquaintances about the weather and other non-serious topics.
Small talk makes people comfortable before moving into serious topics, is useful
to get to know someone or to pass the time of day.  Talk about common interests
or ask simple questions.

13.	LEARN TO READ SOCIAL CLUES:  

Study people, looking for reactions to your physical movements and verbal
statements.  Learn from each of your experiences.

14.	DEVELOP A COMFORTABLE FEELING: 

 Learn to accept and live with the  feeling  of uncomfortableness that sometimes
comes to you from: confusion, being different, or not knowing an answer.  Learn
to pause and endure moments of silence while you gather your thoughts.

15.	CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES:  

Use deep breathing, and look at the big picture.  How important is this anyway?
What will I remember about this in six months? Do not let others or situation
upset you.  Stay in control.

16.	SEEK COMPLEXITY:

Look for multiple problems or activities to be going on simultaneously. This
what you thrive on. Maintain your options.   Complexity also includes tackling
difficult problems that others shy away from because of the difficulty of
resolving them.

17.	FIND A MENTOR (A ROLE MODEL) AND COPY THEIR ACTIONS, WORDING,  ETC.: 

 Learn by observing others that you admire.  How do they do things or respond to
situations?  A good boss may be the best person to learn from.  Observe others
that you consider successful.  How do they do it? Ask them.

18.	ADMIT YOUR PROCESSING DIFFICULTIES:  

Carefully explain your memory dilemma and other needs to sympathetic listeners,
teachers, and in conflicts of misunderstanding.  Ask to take tests orally if you
do not write well or fast, or alternately ask to submit extra papers if you do
not feel comfortable thinking and speaking on your feet.  Your difficulties may
not show.  Let people know that you have difficulties so that they can help you.
Tell your real friends about your needs for more time to think and that you do
not always have a good memory so that they can adjust to you.

19.	USE SPORTS TO BE INCLUDED:  

Develop your abilities in sports by practicing and getting coaching so that you
can do well enough; and you will be included socially as well as on the field.


20.	USE COMEDY AND LAUGHTER TO RELIEVE STRESS:  

Learning difficulties create immense stresses that block learning and create
social difficulties.  Finding opportunities to laugh and enjoy  yourself is
useful as a diversion and eliminator of stress.  Hang out with some people who
find humor in everyday events.  Avoid negative and excessively serious people.

21.	SEEK OUT OPPORTUNITIES TO EXPERIENCE HUMAN TOUCHING:
 
 Shake hands, give hugs, and associate with people who give you hugs.  Touching
is acceptance, a warm positive experience, and builds self-esteem and
confidence. Consider the French tradition of shaking everyone's hand on arrival
and before leaving a meeting or job.  Shake hands and establish eye contact to
build trust. Hug female friends.  Females hug your friends and students.

22.	TRY NOT TO BE SELF-CONSCIOUS:  

Others will relate to you regarding the way that you present yourself.  Be
energetic, friendly, communicative and try to have a positive attitude.  Assume
the trait of self-confidence.  Do not be so concerned about what others might
think about you.  Be yourself.

23.	SPEAK UP FOR YOURSELF OR WRITE A NOTE: 
 
Anything that you feel is unfair, unclear, or unnecessary must be confronted
right away.  Complain.  No matter how you do it, do it immediately.  It's easier
and you will be more emotionally involved.

24.	USE YOUR INTUITIVE POWERS:  

Many Creative Thinkers have special abilities to anticipate, decipher meanings,
and to influence outcomes.  Practice these unique traits.


25.	TALK AT YOUR SPEED: 

Use a comfortable speed for talking.  Do not feel rushed, and stop anyone who
tries to complete your sentence or thoughts, by raising your hand with the palm
facing them.   Stay in control of your ideas.  Speak only as the words or
thoughts come to you.  People will understand you better.

26.	LEARN GOOD EYE CONTACT:  

Keep your head and eyes up and look people in the eye. This is an indicator of
interest, friendliness, and self-confidence that must be practiced to become
natural.  Ask for help with this or practice with strangers that you will never
see again.  Try to be comfortable glancing at others. Practice to learn the
proper amount of time to hold the contact. Keep glancing around the room.  Stop
for only a few seconds to catch someone's eye and then move on. Do not stare; it
makes some people uncomfortable.


TECHNICAL SKILLS:

27.	LEARN HOW TO LEARN: 
 
Develop strategies and tools to learn faster, with less effort, and better
comprehension.  Develop a structure for memorizing, reading for speed and
understanding, and strategies for taking tests to give the answers that they are
seeking.  Learn how to read and send body language.  Learn how to interpret what
is being said to you or about you.

28.	DEVELOP GUIDELINES FOR LEARNING:  

Ask for help with note taking, underling books and articles, studying for tests,
etc., to be more efficient and successful.  Become organized with specific
systems that you develop or borrow from others.

29. 	BUILD STRUCTURE INTO YOUR LIFE:  

Have a plan, daily, weekly, etc.  Know what in advance what you plan to
accomplish, so that you do not have to think about what to do.

30.	TAKE YOUR TIME:
  
It's okay to let people wait for a response. Don't be rushed.  Pause to collect
your thoughts.

31.	READING SKILLS ARE  SIGHT ORIENTED:  

Most Creative Thinkers learn reading best by memorizing whole words by
associating them with pictures. Creative Thinkers have a visual technique of
learning to read that must be supplemented with specific multi-dimensional
assistance for words that have no mental picture or have multiple meanings.
These are usually the small words that are commonly called "sight words," like:
at, the, or  you're.  Fortunately there are only a few hundred of these
troublesome words.

32.	USE YOUR FINGERS TO KEEP YOUR PLACE IN READING:

  Following along with your fingers will help your visual focus and avoid
distractions as you read.

33.	UNDERLINE AS YOU READ:  

Underline important segments for memory, concentration, and comprehension.
Review the underlined portions to summarize and review the material.

34.	LEARN TRICKS TO READ FASTER AND UNDERSTAND MORE:

Try not to move your lips as you read.  Mechanical movements will slow you.  Try
to take in more than one word at a time and reduce the number of eye fixations.
Use flash cards to quickly recognize and say words and phrases.  Practice speed
reading with material that is not important, such as: newspapers, highway signs,
or advertisements on television.


35.	LEARN PHONICS FOR PRONUNCIATION AND SPELLING:  

Phonics is usually a difficult learning task for Creative Thinkers because of
their non-verbal learning style.  Learning to sound out words will help in
making the sounds necessary to pronounce words and to spell them.

36.	STUDY GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION: 

To understand the structure and meaning of reading and writing, you must
unfortunately learn an area of particular difficulty to Creative Thinkers.

37.	BREAK UP PROBLEMS INTO MANAGEABLE UNITS: 

Simple steps taken in an organized sequence will resolve all problems and avoid
the feeling of being overwhelmed by tasks.  Divide assignments into subsections
and do each unit to create the whole.


38.	PRACTICE  RHYTHM,  BALANCE,  AND  COORDINATION:  

Learning dance steps, the beat of music, juggling, and some crazy hand signs,
like those at Club Med, will help you to stay centered and avoid the physical
disorientation that can cause confusion and complicate learning.

39.	REMEMBERING NUMBERS AND OTHER FACTS: 

Each of us has a limited amount of things like numbers that we can remember.
Useful strategies can be learned, such as: stacking or forming groups; but
learning to live with your personal capabilities is necessary to find your
comfort zone.

40.	REMEMBER NAMES THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU:  

Repeating over and over in your mind will help you to remember.  You can also
write down names and other facts.  Lists help to remember.  Play for time.  If
an answer will come to you shortly, start talking about the question as if you
want to make sure you understand.  The answer most likely will come to you and
you can avoid the awkward period of silence that bothers some people.  Socially
say, "I need a little time to think please."  Try to avoid the pauses in
conversation by filling the time with small talk.

41.	USE LISTS: 

Make lists and establish priorities.  Lists are a memory aid to keep track of
what you need to have done or remember.

42.	EXPAND YOUR VOCABULARY:
  
The most important indicator of intelligence to other people is your personal
vocabulary.  Use a dictionary to look up the meaning of new words and expand
your vocabulary. By using a game format in a vocabulary computer program you can
have fun and learn new words.  Pick up a new word or two every week or day and
try to use it in the proper situation with your acquaintances.

43.	USE A NOISE BLOCKER TO AVOID SOME DISTRACTIONS:

An electronic device with earphones can block low frequency noises that may
cause distractions.  This device, or sometimes just background music, can help
some people with concentration. 

44.	USE YOUR MIND TO ORGANIZE YOUR THOUGHTS: 

Daydreaming is a valuable tool.  Practice silently, many times, before speaking.
Get it together before you open your mouth. Athletes practice success by
visualizing.  Visualize and practice in your mind what you would like to
accomplish.  Be positive and see success.  Leave time for Creative Thinking.

45.	BECOME COMPUTER LITERATE: 
 
Become familiar with computers so that you can communicate and learn at your
pace, without personal negative comments. Understand how to use word processing
and spreadsheet programs. 

46.	USE A COMPUTER TO WRITE:  

Word processing programs that include editing, spell checking, and grammar
programs will support and enable your creativity. Word processing opens up the
expressive skills of Creative Thinkers who usually have poor penmanship, and
enables them to make changes easily.

47.	USE A TAPE RECORDER:  

When listening and understanding are difficult, tape verbal information so that
you can check your notes for accuracy.

48.	WRITE MANY DRAFTS:
  
Get your ideas down on paper or in the computer, in any form or order, so you
can play with, develop, refine your creative efforts.  Correct, and revise many
times.  Computers make it easier to create many drafts that will make the result
of much greater quality and acceptance.


49.	PARAPHRASE  BACK:  

Feed back to others what they say to you, in your words. To show your
understanding and make sure the other person agrees with your interpretation,
give them back a summary.  Look for a response of "exactly."

50.	LEARN TO USE HAND SIGNS TO COMMUNICATE:  

Frequently it's easier and faster to shake your head yes or no or put up fingers
to communicate than to formulate speech.  In foreign countries where language is
a barrier to communications various signs can substitute. When appropriate, just
nod or give a hand sign rather than wait for the words to come to you.  To ask
the time point to your watch.  To give the time, hold your watch up so the other
person can read the time directly.

51.	 KNOW WHERE TO FIND EACH LETTER IN THE ALPHABET:
 
Keep a card with the alphabet close by for reference when using the telephone
book or the dictionary.  A simple list of the alphabet to refer to will save
time and effort if this is difficult for you.

52.	USE YOUR STRENGTHS, VERBAL OR WRITING: 
 
If you speak better than you write, talk a lot.  Speak up. If writing is more
comfortable, write extra papers.  Get your ideas down on paper.  Take the time
to do it right, and get help from others with spelling, grammar, editing, etc.
Ask for extra assignments or submit unsolicited reports.


53.	USE GAMES TO LEARN "CALCULATED" RISK TAKING:  

Some games, like backgammon, allow you to experiment with risk taking.  Too
little or too much risk and you can lose.  Learn to play probabilities to get
the best results. Experiment with taking greater risk in practice situations
where you have little to lose.


54.	THINK WITH AN OPEN MIND: 
 
Brainstorm, especially in your head with no constraints using many viewpoints,
to examine solutions to problems.  Explore all options.  Attack problems from
many angles.  Brainstorming is easier for Creative Thinkers since they think in
different terms and see various solutions.  Use this advantage of new ideas.

55.	PRINT RATHER THAN WRITE: 

 If you cannot read your cursive writing or printing is faster, use printing.
Use what ever is faster and accurate, except in school where you must learn the
basics.

56.	USE  SUBCONSCIOUS ABILITIES:   

For difficult serious problems, think about the problem for a few minutes, go on
to something else; and come back to the problem when your 	mind has some
ideas.  Write the ideas down and wait again, maybe as long as a few days.  The
computer in your brain will be running in the background, without any conscious
effort on your part, to create solutions.

57.	DIRECT ORAL DISCUSSIONS TO YOUR STRENGTHS: 
 
Ask questions and talk about subjects you know about; but only ask exploratory
questions and listen when discussing topics that you do not know a lot about.
Bring the subject around to your areas of knowledge by making a comment or
asking a question.

58.	DECIDE IF YOU ARE A MULTI-SENSORY, COOPERATIVE, OR QUIET LEARNER:  

Do you need noise, music, or lots going on, or do you need a quite setting? Can
you process multiple thoughts simultaneously?   For quite learners a headset
that cancels out noise can be a help.  Do you work best alone or with others?
Decide what works best for your creativity and production. Communicate your
needs.  Tell others how you feel that you learn best.


59.	DO  MATH WITH A CALCULATOR:  

Always estimate the answer first to see if the calculator's answer is in "the
ball park." Use what ever is faster and accurate, except in school where you
must learn the basics.


60.	FIND A WAY TO KNOW THE  DAY AND DATE: 

Use a digital watch, refer to the newspaper, or look at the clock in your
computer.  Know where to find information that you can not remember.  Keep a
desk calendar or other reminder if this is a problem for you.

61.	LEARN REFERENCES FOR DIRECTIONS: 

Hold your hands up in front of you with the palms facing away.  The thumb and
index finger of the left hand makes an L, that is a reference for left.  Recall
compass directions by remembering that the sun rises in the East and sets in the
West. Wearing a ring or watch on the left hand or wrist can help.


				CONCLUSIONS

Creative Thinkers are unique because they learn, think, and respond differently
to the world around them.  Many people fail to comprehend the immense courage of
people with learning differences and give up on these individuals prematurely.

Creative Thinkers must be: 

 	Self-confident, 
 	Involved, 
 	Persistent, 
 	Structured, 
 	Questioners, 
 	Students of learning, 
	Embracing  of failure, 
 	Able to live comfortably with momentary confusion/disorientation,and
 	Looking for successes.   

Above all else, Creative Thinkers must make use their unique mental abilities to
think on a higher level.

Creative Thinkers' strengths include:

 	Persistence, 
 	Concentration, 
 	Perception, 
 	Vivid imagination, 
	Creativity, 
	Drive and ambition, 
	Curiosity, 
 	Thinking in pictures instead of words, 
 	Superior reasoning, 
 	Capable of seeing things differently from others, 
 	Love of complexity,
 	Simultaneous multiple thought processing, 
 	Quickly mastering new concepts, and 
 	Not following the Crowd.

Creative Thinkers can frequently see the future clearer than others; because of
their unique thought processing they can complete fragmentary perceptions into
reality in their mind with the three-dimensional visualizations that they
experience as reality.

To achieve higher levels of success and unlock their sometimes supernatural
abilities, Creative Thinkers need some coping strategies to develop a level of
self confidence that is comfortable.  Creative Thinkers may also wish to consult
with a medical doctor, that is knowledgeable in treating dyslexia, to see if
medication will help them as it has helped others, including the authors. 

Creative Thinkers need to learn to use deception to cover their weakness and
direct activities to their strengths.  The 61 common sense compensations
discussed above will enable you to be "street smart," in control of your
destiny, and enable you to concentrate on unlocking the genius abilities of
Creative Thinking.  

We would like to hear from readers.  Please write and let us know what you are
doing to make a difference in your life and the details of any extra-ordinary
mental experience that you have experienced.  We are planning a follow-up book,
"Learning to Unlock and Use Your Creative Thinking."


				       APPENDIX  A

			    REFERENCES:  BOOKS and SEMINARS
			        ( In order of relevance)

Davis, Ronald D.  "The Gift of Dyslexia: Why Some of the Smartest People Can't
Read and How They Can Learn"  . Burlingame, CA: Ability Workshop Press. 1994.

Hartmann, Thom. "Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perception" . Penn
Valley, CA: Underwood-Miller. 1993.

Levinson, Harold. "Smart But Feeling Dumb: The Challenging New Research On
Dyslexia-And How It May Help You"  . New York: Warner Books. 1994.

Hallowell, Edward M. and Ratey, John J.  "Driven To Distraction: Recognizing and
Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood through Adulthood" . New
York: Simon and Schuster. 1994.

Landmark College Conference. "Opening Our Gifts: Dyslexia, ADD, and other
Learning Disabilities ". Ascutney Mountain, VT: 1995.

Landmark School Summer Practicum. "Teaching Students with Learning Differences:
Dyslexic and ADD ." Prides Crossing, MA: 1995.

West, Thomas G. "In The Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Learning
Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity"  . Buffalo, NY:
Prometheus Books. 1991.

Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Deficiency (CHADD) Anual Conference,
Washington, DC, 1995.

Smith, Joan M. "You Don't Have To Be Dyslexic" . Sacramento, CA: Learning Time
Products. 1991.

Hartmann, Thom. "Focus Your Energy: Hunting for Success in Business with
Attention Deficit Disorder" . New York: Pocket Books. 1994.

Blue, Rose. "Me and Einstein: Breaking Through the Reading Barrier" . New York:
Human Sciences Press. 1985.

Nosek, Kathleen. "The Dyslexic Scholar: Helping Your Child Succeed in the School
System" . Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing. 1995.

Hartmann, Thom. "ADD Success Stories: A Guide to Fulfillment for Families with
Attention Deficit Disorder". Grass Valley, CA: Underwood Books. 1995.

Hallowell, Edward M. and Ratey, John J. "Answers To Distraction". New York:
Pantheon Books. 1994.

Vail, Priscilla.  "Smart Kids with School Problems: Thinks to Know and Ways to
Cope" .  New York: Dutton. 1989.

Cronin, Eileen M. "Helping Your Dyslexic Child: A Guide to Improving Your
Child's Reading, Writing, Spelling, Comprehension, and Self-Esteem" . Rocklin,
CA: Prima Publishing. 1994.

Levinson, Harold. and Sanders Addie. "Turning Around the Upside Down Kids:
Helping Dyslexic Kids Overcome Their Disorder" . New York: M. Evans and Company.
1992.

Davis, Ronald D. Davis. "Orientation Counseling" . Video. Burlingame, CA:
Ability Workshop Press. 1994.

Vail, Priscilla.  "About Dyslexia: Unraveling the Myth" . New York: Modern
Learning Press. 1990.

Canter, Lee and Marlene. "Succeeding With Difficult Students: New Strategies For
Reaching Your Most Challenging Students" . Santa Monica, CA: Lee Canter &
Associates. 1993.

Canter, Lee and Marlene.  "Succeeding With Difficult Students:. Workbook" .
Santa Monica, CA: Lee Canter & Associates. 1993.

Davis, Ronald D. Davis. "Perceptual Ability Assessment" . Video. Burlingame, CA:
Ability Workshop Press. 1994.

Huston, Anne Marshall. "Understanding Dyslexia: A Practical Approach for Parents
and Teachers . Lanham", MD: Madison Books. 1992.

Davis, Ronald D. Davis. "Symbol Mastery" . Video. Burlingame, CA: Ability
Workshop Press. 1995.

Canter, Lee and Marlene. "Assertive Discipline For Parents" . Santa Monica, CA:
Lee Canter & Associates. 1985.

Lavoie, Richard. "Last One Picked...First One Picked On" . Video. Cambridge, MA:
PBS. (800) 344-3337. 1994.

Rosner, Jerome. "Helping Children Overcome Learning Difficulties".  New York:
Walker and Co. 1993.

Osman, Betty. "No One to Play With" . New York: Academic Therapy Publishing.
1989.

Flesch, Rudolf. "Why Johnny Can't Read: And What You Can Do About It" . New
York: Harper Collins. 1955.

Knox, Jean McBee. "Learning Disabilities" . New York: Chelsea House Publishers.
1989.

Moss, Robert M.  "Why Johnny Can't Concentrate: Coping With Attention Deficit
Problems"  . New York: Bantam Books. 1990.

Novick, Barbara Z. and Arnold, Maureen M. "Why Is My Child Having Trouble at
School?"   New York: Villard Books. 1991.

Silver, Larry B. "The Misunderstood Child: A Guide for Parents of Children with
Learning Disabilities" . New York: Tab Books. 1992.

Lavoie, Richard. "F.A.T. City" . Video. S. Norwalk, CT: CACLD (203) 838-5010,
1993.

Simpson, Eileen. "Reversals: A Personal Account of Victory Over Dyslexia" .
Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. 1979.

Waites, Lucius. "Specific Dyslexia and Other Developmental Problems in Children:
A Synopsis" .  Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service, Inc. 1990.

Levinson, Harold. "A Scientific Watergate - Dyslexia" . New York: Stonebridge.
1994.

Wagner, Rudolph F. "Dyslexia and Your Child: A Guide for Teachers and Parents" .
New York: Harper and Row, 1971.

Spence, Gerry. "How To Argue And Win Every Time" . New York: St. Martin's Press.
1995.  (The chapter, "Arguing with Kids.")

"Parent's Manual" . Boston: Federation for Children with Special Needs. 1994.

"A Parents Guide to the Special Education Regulations" . Malden, MA: The
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Education. 1994.

"Chapter 766 Regulations" . Malden, MA: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Department of Education. 1994.

"A Parents Guide to the Special Education Appeals Process". Malden, MA: The
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Education. 1994.

"Massachusetts Chapter 766 Approved In-State and Out-of-State Schools and
Programs That Serve Publicly Funded Special Education Students" . Malden, MA:
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Education. 1994.


					APPENDIX B

		 STUDENT'S  SELF-TEST  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING  (C)

   (This test is intended for students age 7 to 15, an adult test follows)

This test is an approximation of Creative Thinking for your own use.  This is
not a scientific or medical test to assess learning differences, and is limited
by your recall abilities and your honesty in answering the questions. 

Please answer all questions by writing one number: for example 10 if you agree
strongly,  0 if you do not agree at all, 5 for undecided, or some other number
between 0 and 10 that you feel best represents your understanding of your
situation. 


1.     I have problems remembering simple things like: people's names.	____

2.     I understand what I see better than what I hear.
____

3.     I think visually with three-dimensional images in my head.	____

4.     I get motion or sea sickness.					____

5.     I feel that I am different from others.				____

6.     I take longer to think and respond than others.			____

7.     I am intuitive and can develop incomplete ideas into reality 
       in my head.							____

8.     I can pay attention "intensely" for short periods of time	____

9.     I have had problems with spelling, reading speed, and/or       	 
       understanding what I have read.					____

10.    My mind is easily lead astray from what I an doing.		____

11.    My mind is constantly thinking.					____

12.    I sometimes feel embarrassed in social situations, 
       relationships with others, or in crowds.
____
							
13.    I file things by making piles; I am somewhat disorganized.	____

14.    I prefer situations that are not structured, where I am
free to do my thing, whatever that is.				____

15.    I am creative, curious, and have a powerful imaginative.
____

16.    I have fear of heights, the dark, or speaking in public.
____

17.    I am impulsive and impatient, I prefer immediate pleasure.	____

18.    I am able to keep three or more thoughts or projects in my 	
	 mind and process them at the same time.			____

19.    I sometimes experience confusion.				____

20.    I have had problems with my ears.				____

21.    I sometimes have difficulty finding the appropriate words 	
       to express myself.						____

22.    I see things that others do not, until I explain it to them.	____

23.    I feel that what ever I accomplish it is not enough.		____

24.    I sometimes feel that I am inferior to others.			____

25.    I have poor handwriting.
____

26.    I have trouble relaxing.  I am always active.			____

27.    When I enter one of my rooms, I can tell if anything has been
disturbed.							____

28.    I am bored by ordinary tasks.					____

29.    I am flexible and capable of changing tactics on a 
       moments notice.							____

30.    I seek stimulation. I am capable of facing dangers that 
       others would avoid.	   					____

									   		
TOTAL SCORE:    ____


(C) Copyright 1995  Daniele M. and Paul F. Murray.  
Not to be reprinted or  reproduced in any form without the express written
permission of the authors.




			UNDERSTANDING  YOUR  STUDENT  TEST  RESULTS

		     STUDENT'S  SELF-TEST  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING  (C)


To determine an approximation of your individual degree of Creative Thinking,
add all of the scores and divide the total by 30 to get your average or RESULT.


Total: __________   divided by 30 =  _____   RESULT

If your Result is:

 	Above 8 you are an Extremely Creative Thinker, 
 
 	Between 6 and 8 a Highly Creative Thinker,
 
 	Between 4 and 6 a Mildly Creative Thinker, and

 	Less than 4 a Narrowly Focused Thinker.


If you scored 0 consider yourself very unique.  You are probably the only person
who does not have any learning differences or unfortunately the special mental
abilities of Creative Thinking.   Sorry.

(C) Copyright 1995  Daniele M. and Paul F. Murray.  
Not to be reprinted or  reproduced in any form without the express written
permission of the authors.



					APPENDIX  C

			ADULT'S  SELF-TEST  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING  (C)

		(This test is intended for those over age 15 because they 
		            have developed compensating stratagies)

This test is an approximation of Creative Thinking for your own use.  This is
not a scientific or medical test to assess learning differences, and is limited
by your recall abilities and your honesty in answering the questions. 

Please answer all questions by writing one number: for example 10 if you agree
strongly,  0 if you do not agree at all, 5 for undecided, or some other number
between 0 and 10 that you feel best represents your understanding of your
situation. 

Adults sometimes develop compensating strategies to cope with their level of
Creative Thinking.  Therefore adults should give two answers, one for their
state of mind during the last two years and a second answer for anytime during
their lifetime.


1. I have problems remembering simple things like: people's names. ____  ____

2. I understand what I see better than what I hear.		   ____  ____

3. I think visually with three-dimensional images in my head.	   ____  ____

4. I get motion or sea sickness.				   ____  ____ 

5. I feel that I am different from others.		    	   ____  ____

6. I take longer to think and respond than others.  		   ____  ____

7. I am intuitive and can develop incomplete ideas into 
   reality in my head.						   ____  ____

8. I can pay attention "intensely" for short periods of time.	   ____  ____

9. I have had problems with spelling, reading speed, 
   and/or understanding what I have read.			   ____  ____

10. My mind is easily lead astray from what I an doing.		   ____
____

11. My mind is constantly thinking.			    	   ____  ____

12. I sometimes feel embarrassed in social situations, 
    relationships with others, or in crowds.			   ____  ____
							
13. I file things by making piles; I am somewhat disorganized.	   ____  ____

14. I prefer situations are not structured, where I am free to 
    do my thing,whatever that it is.				   ____  ____

15. I am creative, curious, and have a powerful imaginative.	   ____  ____

16. I have fear of heights, the dark, or speaking in public.	   ____  ____

17. I am impulsive and impatient, I prefer immediate pleasure.	   ____  ____

18. I am able to keep three or more thoughts or projects in my 
    mind and process them at the same time.			   ____  ____

19. I sometimes experience confusion.		     		   ____  ____

20. I have had problems with my ears.			     	   ____  ____

21. I sometimes have difficulty finding the appropriate words 
    to express myself.						   ____  ____

22. I see things others do not until I explain it to them.	   ____  ____

23. I feel that what ever I accomplish it is not enough.	   ____  ____

24. I sometimes feel that I am inferior to others.  	           ____  ____

25. I have poor handwriting.				    	   ____  ____

26. I have trouble relaxing.  I am always active.    		   ____  ____

27. When I enter one of my rooms, I can tell if anything 
    has been disturbed.						   ____
____

28. I am bored by ordinary tasks.				   ____  ____

29. I am flexible and capable of changing tactics on a 
    moments notice.						   ____  ____

30. I seek stimulation. I am capable of facing dangers that 
    others would avoid.						   ____
____

TOTAL SCORES:							   ____  ____


(C) Copyright 1995  Daniele M. and Paul F. Murray.  
Not to be reprinted or  reproduced in any form without the express written
permission of the authors.


				UNDERSTANDING  YOUR TEST  RESULTS
			 ADULT"S  SELF-TEST  FOR  CREATIVE  THINKING  (C)

To determine an approximation of your individual degree of Creative Thinking,
both currently and over your lifetime, divide the total for each category by 30
to get your RESULT.

Totals:
Within the past two years ____  divided by 30 =  ____   RESULT
During your lifetime    _______  divided by 30 =  ____   RESULT

If your Result is:
 	Above 8 you are an Extremely Creative Thinker, 
 	Between 6 and 8 a Highly Creative Thinker,
 	Between 4 and 6 a Mildly Creative Thinker, and
 	Less than 4 a Narrowly Focused Sequential Thinker.

If you scored 0 consider yourself very unique.  You are probably the only person
who does not have any learning differences or unfortunately the special mental
abilities of Creative Thinking.   Sorry.


(C) Copyright 1995  Daniele M. and Paul F. Murray. 
Not to be reprinted or  reproduced in any form without the express written
permission of the authors.

 
					APPENDIX D

	    SOME COMMON TRAITS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LEARNING DIFFERENCES OF 
                      DYSLEXIA AND ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER

Each person is different and will have a unique combination of the common traits
listed below. 

1. 	Thinks visually.
2. 	Daydreams.
3.      Easily distractible.
4. 	Aware of everything.
5.      Able to do multiple things at the same time.
6. 	Seeks stimulation.
7.	Highly creative.
8.      Immature social behavior, says what comes to mind.
9.	Poor penmanship.
10. 	Difficulty remembering names.
11.	Seeks immediate gratification.
12.	Impulsive and impatient.
13.	Suffers from motion sickness.
14.	Can see patterns into the future.
15.	Capable of intense short-term focus.
16.	Quick decision maker.
17.	Bored by ordinary tasks.
18.	Risk taker.
19. 	Have had problems with ears.
20.	More independent than a team player.
21.	Sees the big picture.
22.	Curious.
23.	Experience thoughts as reality.
24.	Subject to disorientation.
25. 	Sometimes has psychic - extrasensory abilities.
26.	Highly intuitive.
27.	Short attention span, inattentive.
28.	Has a vivid imagination.
29.	Artistic.
30.	Has a sense of underachievement.
31.	Have spatial orientation problems (left/right, north/south)
32.	Talks excessively.
33.	Reverses letters and numbers.
34.	Slow reader when young.
35.	Difficulty with math concepts.
36.	Problems with self-esteem.
37.	Problems mastering phonics and spelling.
38.	Problems understanding the rules of grammar.
39.	Reads best by memorizing, the "Look-Say System."
40.	Always active-constantly thinking,.
41.	Learns best by hands on, rather than lecture or reading.
42.	Low tolerance for frustration.
43.	Realize that they are different from others.
44.	Take longer to think and respond than others.
45.	Able to create a complete mental picture from pieces.
46.	Somewhat disorganized.
47.	Capable of changing on a moments notice.
48.	Have phobias: like fear of dark, heights, speaking in public.
49.	Prefer unstructured situations with freedom.
50.	See things that others don't.


					APPENDIX E

		     SOME  PSYCHIC EXPERIENCES OF CREATIVE THINKERS

CONTROLLING TIME:

 While skating down the ice in a hockey game, I see the play in slow motion
unfold in my mind.  I practice in my mind before I execute the play. DB
 
 In a hockey game, I was waiting for a pass from the corner of the rink and I
was able to see the location to shoot on the goal and calculate the angle to
take the pass and shoot in one motion. It was easy because everything seemed to
be occurring in slow-motion. DB

CONTROLLING EVENTS:

 Before I roll the dice in a backgammon game, I can frequently call the outcome,
especially if I need a certain combination of numbers to make a desired move. CM
 
 I can make people do what I want them to do by thinking hard and passing a
message to them from my mind without saying or doing anything.

PREDICTING FUTURE OUTCOMES:

 I get a feeling about the future movement of prices like interest rates or
stock prices that seems to be intuitive. JB
 
 Frequently, at places like Las Vegas, I get a mental picture of outcomes such
as six wins then go away.  It may seem like wishful thinking; but I find it to
be true many times so I follow this message and press my bets.  KM
 
 I practice when listening to a television advertisement that is going to read a
telephone number.   Frequently, I can say the number of most of it out loud
before the announcer.  JR

COMMUNICATING TELEPATHICALLY:

 When someone is stuck for a word, I can frequently pass it to them by repeating
it in my head and concentrating on the other person.  VS

DOING COMPLEX MATH MENTALLY:

 I can do square roots in my head.  I just get an answer. BF

 I can solve many equations in my head.  I do not need to through all the steps
on paper, I see them in my head.  DM

SEEING SOLUTIONS FROM AN EXAMINATION OF THE PARTS:

 I look at computer programs and see problem areas, such as: logic or processing
paths that are faster.  I can see a picture in my mind of the whole program and
rearrange it in my mind.  MR
 
 I can enter a room that I have never been in before and sense things that
appear to be out of place or don't belong there.  DM
 
 The CIA used a psychic to locate the wreckage of a spy plane that went down in
Africa, after satellites and other measures could not find it.  The physic came
up with the longitude and latitude and when the cameras were trained there the
wreckage was seen.  From: INSIGHT  Magazine 10/23/95.

end.
Received on Saturday, 9 December 1995 19:22:59 GMT

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