W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-tag@w3.org > August 2007

Re: interesting hash in URLs

From: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 16 Aug 2007 17:46:03 -0500
To: noah_mendelsohn@us.ibm.com
Cc: raman@google.com, www-tag@w3.org
Message-Id: <1187304363.29837.507.camel@pav>

On Thu, 2007-07-26 at 11:06 -0400, noah_mendelsohn@us.ibm.com wrote:
[...]
> > So what does the '#' in that URL mean?
> 
> Any reason it doesn't mean:  "The string 
> /video/living/2007/07/06/cnn.heroes.scott.southworth.two.cnn is a 
> suspiciously weird looking fragid which, by the way, does not resolve per 
> the definition of the media type returned by GET."?

Because the definition of the HTML media type is falling behind.

HTML documents can have scripts now, and those scripts can
interpret the fragment in strange and wonderful ways.


p.s. I got my feet wet with Ajax last week...

Notes on GRDDL/JavaScript Development
Dan Connolly, Aug 2007
http://homer.w3.org/~connolly/projects/grddljs/raw-file/f51f4e01ea4b/devnotes.html
http://homer.w3.org/~connolly/projects/grddljs/

That resulted in several comments on the XHR spec.
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-webapi/2007Aug/thread.html

JavaScript is clearly a powerful drug. Everybody that sells
it will please include these two documents in the package...

"Powerful languages inhibit information reuse."
 -- http://www.w3.org/2001/tag/doc/leastPower

"see how we can use Javascript, but still maintain accessibility"
 -- http://onlinetools.org/articles/unobtrusivejavascript/

-- 
Dan Connolly, W3C http://www.w3.org/People/Connolly/
Received on Thursday, 16 August 2007 22:46:15 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Thursday, 26 April 2012 12:47:47 GMT