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Re: Arch Doc: 26 September 2003 Editor's Draft

From: Roy T. Fielding <fielding@apache.org>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 13:20:57 -0700
Cc: Tim Bray <tbray@textuality.com>, www-tag@w3.org
To: "Ian B. Jacobs" <ij@w3.org>
Message-Id: <999AAB9C-F383-11D7-BAFC-000393753936@apache.org>

I would normally refer to the Web as an Internet-scale information 
space,
but I suppose network-spanning is good enough.

    The World Wide Web is a network-spanning information space
    consisting of resources that are interconnected by links
    defined within that space.

> How about this (mostly copying RF's text):
>
>    The World Wide Web is an information space consisting of
>    resources that are interconnected by links defined within that
>    space.  This information space is the basis of, and is shared
>    by, a number of information systems, including the
>    "traditional" Web and emerging technologies such as Web
>    Services and the Semantic Web.

No, that is missing the point.  There is no single Web system,
nor Web Service system, nor (I think) Semantic Web system.  There
are many thousands of individual systems in play at any given point
at time, each one independent from the others aside from the shared
information space and a common set of expectations about their
interactions with other agents within "their" system.  That is why
I did not enumerate the technologies du jour.

> Within each of these systems,
>    agents (e.g., browsers, servers, spiders, and proxies) acting
>    within diverse networks provide, retrieve, create, analyze,
>    and reason about resources.
>
>    [Rest of abstract is RF text, though I may split into paras]

Why?  Abstracts are not meant to be multi-paragraph entities.

....Roy
Received on Tuesday, 30 September 2003 16:21:05 GMT

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