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Perlin and simplex noise

From: David Dailey <ddailey@zoominternet.net>
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2012 12:51:32 -0400
To: <www-svg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <000b01cd86cf$b5da5770$218f0650$@net>
I know you all found the concepts of declarative randomness a bit
distasteful (we're giving a talk on it at the conference in Switzerland,
soon) and given the history of society's reaction to randomness, one can
perhaps understand if not appreciate that reaction.

 

However, I wondered if thought has been given to Simplex noise in addition
to Perlin noise[1]? 

 

Both were developed by the same fellow, but Simplex has the advantage that
it is computationally a lot more tractable: O(n^2) instead of O(2^n). Our
recent book [2] has, to my knowledge, the most extensive treatment of
feTurbulence in filter chains, and when used in conjunction with
feDisplacement, I can report that it does slow down most "modern browsers"
(except of course for ASV*) to a crawl. 

 

SVG 1.1 seems to use the older noise since it references Ebert et al, AP
Professional, 1994, and Perlin's paper on Simplex noise didn't appear until
2001,

 

Coincidentally, are all the decisions of SVG2 pretty much irrevocable? I see
that you've moved to another level of formality with the draft. If not, you
might wanna wait a bit on the <replicate> and declarative randomness stuff
until you see how expressive the two are in combination. But then, I
suppose, there is always SVG5 to look forward to - any volunteers?

 

Cheers

David

 

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplex_noise

[2]
http://www.amazon.com/Building-Web-Applications-David-Dailey/dp/0735660123 

* I'm half teasing here, just since some have come to use the term "modern
browser" specifically to exclude ASV. 
Received on Thursday, 30 August 2012 16:52:07 GMT

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