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Re: [CSSWG][css-writing-modes] Last Call for Comments on CSS3 Writing Modes

From: fantasai <fantasai.lists@inkedblade.net>
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 2014 00:02:01 -0800
Message-ID: <52F492F9.3020705@inkedblade.net>
To: Koji Ishii <kojiishi@gluesoft.co.jp>
CC: CE Whitehead <cewcathar@hotmail.com>, "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>, "unicode@unicode.org" <unicode@unicode.org>
On 01/27/2014 05:34 PM, Koji Ishii wrote:
> On Dec 21, 2013, at 20:39, CE Whitehead <cewcathar@hotmail.com <mailto:cewcathar@hotmail.com>> wrote:
>
>> 4.3
>> "alphabetic
>>     The alphabetic baseline is assumed to be at the under margin edge.
>> "central
>>     The central baseline is assumed to be halfway between the under and over margin edges of the box. "
>> =>
>> "alphabetic
>>     The alphabetic baseline is assumed to be at the under-margin edge.
>> "central
>>     The central baseline is assumed to be halfway between the under- and over-margin edges of the box. "
>>
>> {COMMENT:  normally when you use two words to modify a single word, as when "under margin", "over margin" modify the word,
>> "edge" or "edges", then it is customary to join the two modifying words with a hyphen.}
>
> Fixed.

Actually, this is an incorrect edit. I've reverted it. Under and
over are in this case used as adjectives, and are not part of
the word "margin". This follows the pattern of "left margin" as
opposed to "left-margin".

>> 6.2 second paragraph (after the list of four "flow-relative  directions" -- block-end, block-start, etc.)
>> "Where unambiguous (or dual-meaning), the terms start and end are used in place of block-start/inline-start and
>> block-end/inline-end, respectively."
>>
>> {COMMENT: "unambiguous" is the opposite of "dual-meaning" -- "dual meaning" means "ambiguous"; do you mean the following?
>> (if so it's o.k. to eliminate the stuff in parentheses altogether):}
>
> Fixed.

Similarly, this is an incorrect edit. The intent is the opposite
of "ambiguous" in the sense of "lacking clearness or definiteness".
If the intent is clear from context OR if the intent encompasses
both meanings, then the ambiguous terms start/end are allowed to
be used. I have removed the parentheses to make this clear.

~fantasai
Received on Friday, 7 February 2014 08:02:37 UTC

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