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Re: [css-overflow][css3-regions] CSS Overflow covering CSS Regions use cases + [css3-gcpm]

From: Johannes Wilm <johannes.wilm@sourcefabric.org>
Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2013 14:46:50 -0400
Message-ID: <CAJYMerm8udUUuj5GHj4MfMVx1jdi_Fz4ANKEAjB_fNhzyFATeA@mail.gmail.com>
To: Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
On Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 3:21 PM, Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com> wrote:

> Johannes Wilm wrote:
>
>  > > I've been trying to view your examples in recent Chrome builds, but
>  > > I'm not sure I see the same as you. Could you post some screenshots --
>  > > that would open an interesting discussion on how to best achived
>  > > book-like content in HTML/CSS.
>  > >
>  > You need to turn on CSS Regions ("webkit experimental features") in
> Chrome
>  > to see this.
>
>  > http://sourcefabric.github.io/BookJS/test4.png
>
> The PNG looks good! However, here is what I see (after enabling
> "experimental Webkit features" in 28.0.1490 canary):
>
>    http://people.opera.com/howcome/2013/tests/bookjs.png
>
> Do I need to flip any other switches to create the paged presentation
> you achive?
>

You shouldn't need to. But we are all on Linux at my organization, which
means I need to wait a little longer before I can get the newest versions
of Chrome/Chromium. I am currently on 28.0.1485.0 dev and it works good.
Chrome stable (26) should also work with this.
 ...

If it's not working now, it should in a few days, once I see what has
changed and make adjustments to the javascript.

also see

http://blogs.adobe.com/webplatform/2012/12/05/web-to-print-and-seeing-your-work-live-on-paper/
http://blogs.adobe.com/webplatform/2013/04/17/fidus-writer-foxy-css-regions-spotted-in-the-wild/



 > I had seen the first but not the second post before. It is my
> understanding
>  > that this is something that is only available in a special Opera branch
> of
>  > Webkit/Blink which is not available to the public yet, correct?
>
> The second post points to a document that is renedred by Prince and
> Antenna House -- i.e., two batch processors. Some of the features
> tested only make sense on paper (like bleed, CMYK, and crop/cross
> marks), while most also make sense in paged screen-based
> presentations. It think we should try to keep the two worlds
> connected.
>

that sounds good!  I absolutely agree -- it's important to eb able to see
it on the screen like that.

>
> The first post has a link to a page with a "prefixed" document which
> can be rendered in four different implementations:
>
>   http://people.opera.com/howcome/2013/reader/news/i1prefix.html
>
> The implementations are:
>
>   - Opera's Presto implementation (e.g., Opera 12.15)
>   - Opera's WebKit/Blink
>

Can this rendering engine be found anywhere for non-Opera employees? Will
it be part of the regular Blink any time soon?


>   - Prince
>   - AntennaHouse


> The latter two produce PDFs like these:
>
>
> http://people.opera.com/howcome/2013/02-reader/i1-a4-landscape-prince.pdf
>   http://people.opera.com/howcome/2013/02-reader/i1-a4-portrait-ah.pdf


Really nice!


-- 
Johannes Wilm
BookJS Developer
johannes.wilm@sourcefabric.org

www.sourcefabric.org

US: +1 520 399 8880
skype: johanneswilm
Received on Friday, 26 April 2013 18:47:17 UTC

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