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Re: [css3-writing-modes] text-orientation:upright

From: koba <koba@antenna.co.jp>
Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2012 10:41:24 +0900
To: www-style@w3.org
Message-Id: <20120924104124.4285.A67A3BA5@antenna.co.jp>

> [CSSWG] Minutes and Resolutions 2012-08-15 Wed PM II: Writing Modes, ...
> http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2012Aug/0899.html
>    - RESOLVED: text-orientation:upright is a forced upright; it always means upright
>                (because UTR50 does not define SVO anymore)

At the UTR#50 forum, the purpose of SVO is explained by Eric to define
the default direction of characters for English language [1].  
I wonder why text-orientation:upright depends on SVO of UTR#50.
Was text-orientation:upright considered the property for English? 

But if not, I can not understand the reason why the cut of SVO feature in
UTR#50 affects CSS  text-orientation:upright.

Based on JIS X4051 and JLReq, SVO/MVO should be considered one of layout
styles of vertical writing[2]. CSS should be designed as flex as
possible to make it easy to specify any style.  Isolation of style from
content is considered to be the basic concept of CSS. 

But current UTR#50 asignes a specific orientation and glyph to every character
points and it makes it difficult to change style by CSS.

You took the wrong way at frist, and you had better go back to the start
point.

Best regards,

Tokushige Kobayashi

[1] http://www.unicode.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=331
[2] http://www.unicode.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=346
-- 
koba <koba@antenna.co.jp>
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Received on Monday, 24 September 2012 01:41:50 GMT

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