W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > September 2012

Re: Discussing possibilities of a 'CSS-ignore' rule.

From: Ketan Singh <singh.ketan7@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2012 07:09:53 +0530
Message-ID: <CAH8sMT9kVaTQyHiWTV2-Z1Cpjfr7OB9MpTXwDveCuAf97G0xqw@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Tab Atkins Jr." <jackalmage@gmail.com>, François REMY <fremycompany_pub@yahoo.fr>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
> That's not what you're asking for.  You're asking for the ability to
> say that one set of stylesheets applies to your element and its
> descendants, while another set doesn't.  That's not something you can
> handle with a CSS property - it's a layering violation.

Nope. I meant exactly what I've written. I'm not talking about the ability
to 'selective ignore'  stylesheets. I'm talking about an ability to
'collectively ignore'  all the styling of a 'certain type' for a set of
selected elements. By 'certain type' I mean any one or a combination of
internal, inline and external 'types'.

E.g. I should have the ability to completely get rid any styling done by
ANY external sheet for a certain set of selected elements, without having
to manipulate those external style sheets, if i define 'INTERNALLY"
something like
*.my_image .no-style {
     css-ignore:external;
}*

I understand Francois's opinion about the limitations of the cascading,
which I do realize now. So one thing we can do is to make things in a
manner that any 'css-ignore' can induce a 'style ignore' capability, only
for lower priority types.
To make it more clear, here's an example:
*.my_image .no-style {  *
*    css-ignore:external;  *
*}*
Only when the above definition is done as an internal (or inline) style
definition, only then can the browser ignore every external stylesheet.


If you ask me right now, to get rid of 2 external stylesheets A.css & B.css
from a webpage without having to tweak with those lengthy and 'finalized'
external stylesheets A.css & B.css, which were made earlier in the
designing process, I frankly don't know a legitimate and 'non hackish' way
to do that.
Here. something like
*body {*
*    css-ignore: external;*
*} *
or
*body { *
*    css-ignore:A.css; *
*    css-ignore:B.css; *
*} *
could have been really helpful.

It is possible to define the 'css-ignore' property, only as an inline or
internal definition. Such that, an internal 'css-ignore' definition can
only ignore external definitions, while an inline 'css-ignore' can ignore
both internal and external defintions.
External stylesheets, being at the bottom of the priority list, won't be
able to do anything.

Please let me know your thoughts. Hope I was clear this time.
Received on Monday, 24 September 2012 01:40:20 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 26 March 2013 17:21:00 GMT