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RE: Discussing possibilities of a 'CSS-ignore' rule.

From: Belov, Charles <Charles.Belov@sfmta.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2012 20:54:13 +0000
To: 'Tab Atkins Jr.' <jackalmage@gmail.com>
CC: "'www-style@w3.org'" <www-style@w3.org>
Message-ID: <C1BED60DEFFFB2479E3EE227BF749D2D531189E1@SV6EX10MBX2.muni.sfgov.org>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tab Atkins Jr. [mailto:jackalmage@gmail.com]
> Sent: Friday, September 21, 2012 1:40 PM
> To: Ketan Singh
> Cc: www-style@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Discussing possibilities of a 'CSS-ignore' rule.
> 
> On Thu, Sep 20, 2012 at 4:53 PM, Ketan Singh <singh.ketan7@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> > This makes me feel a need for something that could be called 'css-
> ignore'.
> > E.g. If I had a div with id 'my_div', I could have used something like
> > #my_div{  css-ignore:external;  } which could have asked the browser
> > not to associate any external style sheets with 'my_div'. The
> > css-ignore rule could have possible values such as 'inline',
> > 'internal', 'external', which could make the browser ignore css of a
> > certain 'kind' for a particular selection of elements.
> > I guess, there are many possible ways this can be achieved, many of
> > them kind of 'hackish' like tweaking it using jQuery; but having a
> > proper legitimate rule for it would certainly be helpful for many of us.
> > In addition, it can also be a great tool for developers, who might
> > need it to test their codes, in case they don't have a proper debugger.

>
> This is a good use-case, and we have several ways coming down the pipeline
> of helping to address it!
> 
> First, we've discussed (but not yet put into a draft) an "all"
> property, which only takes the values "initial" and "inherit".  It acts as
> a shorthand for *all* properties.  This lets you shut down inheritance
> from the outside world, resetting you to initial values the same as if it
> was in an independent document.
> 
> However, that's not always enough.  It prevents inheritance from leaking
> values into your element, but the outer document's CSS might still
> accidentally target elements *inside* your element.  The Web Components
> spec being developed in the WebApps working group can address this.  It
> will allow you to write your popup as a component, and block all outside
> CSS from targeting elements inside of it - only the styles you define or
> link *inside* of the popup will apply.
> 
> So, nothing needs to be done here - your use-case is already being
> addressed by other technologies we're developing inside the W3C.
> 

For the sake of accessibility, I hope this does not include blocking the user style sheet.

Hope this helps,
Charles Belov
SFMTA Webmaster
Received on Friday, 21 September 2012 20:57:37 GMT

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