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Re: @import -- allow at any place in stylesheet.

From: Alan Gresley <alan@css-class.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2012 12:45:59 +1100
Message-ID: <4F1775D7.8040702@css-class.com>
To: "Marat Tanalin | tanalin.com" <mtanalin@yandex.ru>
CC: Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>, www-style@w3.org
On 19/01/2012 8:26 AM, Marat Tanalin | tanalin.com wrote:
> 18.01.2012, 21:58, "Sylvain Galineau"<sylvaing@microsoft.com>:

>> Then provide one or more real-world example demonstrating all this will happen
>> and explain why. General assertions are insufficient.
>
> See http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2012Jan/0760.html

Tab gave an alternative method for this.

<style>
@import "main.css";
@import "override.css";
</style>

This does make sense considering how error recovery is handled in CSS 
(the same even happens in IE6). Take for instance the below test case. 
Here are some questions.

1. Do you know why only some of the <p>s have a green background?

2. Even though something has gone wrong, do you expect that the 
"override.css" would still work?

(this would not come into play with Tab's alternative method)


<!DOCTYPE html>

<style type="text/css">
p { background: red; color: white }
#t1 { background: green } #t2 { background: green } #t3 { background: 
green } #t4 { background: green } #t5 { background: green #t6 { 
background: green } #t7 { background: green } #t8 { background: green } 
#t9 { background: green }

@import "override.css";
</style>

<p id="t1">Some text</p>
<p id="t2">Some more text</p>
<p id="t3">Some more text</p>
<p id="t4">Some more text</p>
<p id="t5">Some more text</p>
<p id="t6">Some more text</p>
<p id="t7">Some more text</p>
<p id="t8">Some more text</p>
<p id="t9">Some more text</p>



-- 
Alan Gresley
http://css-3d.org/
http://css-class.com/
Received on Thursday, 19 January 2012 01:46:40 GMT

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