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RE: [css3-regions] regions forming stacking contexts

From: Alex Mogilevsky <alexmog@microsoft.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2012 06:56:06 +0000
To: Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com>, Alan Stearns <stearns@adobe.com>
CC: fantasai <fantasai.lists@inkedblade.net>, "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>
Message-ID: <D51C9E849DDD0D4EA38C2E539856928412DCF6DD@TK5EX14MBXC214.redmond.corp.microsoft.com>
I think that informative note 5 is trying to say that anything within a region is rendered as a single layer as far as anything overlapping that region might be concerned, including other regions with same flow.

I tend to agree that the current wording doesn't make it much more clear or intuitive. Perhaps just removing the note would be fine, we already say (normatively) that region has its own stacking context...

Vincent, what do you think? Was there a particular issue raised that called for the note?

Alex

-----Original Message-----
From: Tab Atkins Jr. [mailto:jackalmage@gmail.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2012 5:46 PM
To: Alan Stearns
Cc: fantasai; www-style@w3.org
Subject: Re: [css3-regions] regions forming stacking contexts

On Tue, Jan 3, 2012 at 4:55 PM, Alan Stearns <stearns@adobe.com> wrote:
> Where are the stacking rules for inline breaking defined? And do you 
> have a ready example of overlapping element fragments? I can easily 
> overlap text where font-size is larger than line-height, but I'm 
> guessing you have a different overlap situation in mind.

I'm not sure where they're defined, but I believe she basically *was* talking about that, and here's an example:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<div>
  foo
  <span>bar bar bar bar bar bar bar bar</span>
  foo
</div>
<style>
div { width: 8em; line-height: 10px;}
span { background: rgba(0,0,0,.2); }
</style>

The <span> is overlapping itself due to inline breaking here.  The stacking order is determined by normal CSS rules, such that the second fragment is on top of the first.

~TJ

Received on Friday, 6 January 2012 06:56:49 GMT

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